April 20 at 11am ET

Sharyl Attkisson explains her resignation; Glenn Greenwald's first interview since Pulitzer announcement; Aereo’s CEO Chet Kanojia previews Supreme Court case.
April 19th, 2014
02:45 PM ET

Preview: Exclusive Interview with Glenn Greenwald

Above, Brian Stelter talks with Glenn Greenwald in his first interview since The Guardian and The Washington Post received the Pulitzer Prize for public service. Greenwald was a member of the Guardian team that reported on NSA mass surveillance programs using documents leaked by Edward Snowden last year.

 
Watch the full interview on Sunday, April 20th at 11am ET.

Read Brian's article to learn more about the other recipients of the Pulitzer prize for public service here.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
April 14th, 2014
01:53 PM ET

From Brian: 6 takeaways from April 13 show

If you weren't able to tune in on Sunday, here were some of the moments that really stood out to me:

1. Senator Al Franken joined me to discuss his opposition to the proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger, days after he participated in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing about it. Franken said some influential opponents of the merger — other major media companies — are staying quiet because they are "afraid of retaliation:"


STELTER: There are CEOs of big media companies that own lots of cable channels that are very concerned about this merger, but we haven't heard them speak out.



FRANKEN: Well, that speaks volumes about how anti-competitive this is. You know why they don't speak out? They come to my office and say, 'This is off the record.' Then they talk about how it's going to be anti-competitive, but - 



STELTER: You can't name names, then?



FRANKEN: No. They're afraid of retaliation. Doesn't that tell you everything you need to know?

Here's the rest of the interview.

2. "What cameras do for people and what shows like this do for people is, they give them two things. They give them profile and they give them access. And profile and access equals influence, especially in this town. But it's also the dangerous part of it, because, again, what are you using your podium, your platform for? Is it to inform the audience? Is it to persuade the audience? Is it to feather your own nest? Is it to run for office yourself someday, whether you declare that or not? And that's what the public has a right to know." —Frank Sesno, director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University, discussing the ethical quandaries that exist when television personalities engage in political activities.

3. Keli Goff and Michelle Fields had quite a debate about Stephen Colbert, who will be succeeding David Letterman as the host of "The Late Show." Fields asserted that "Colbert's main goal isn't just to entertain. It's also to push a political agenda." Here's the video of the segment.

4. After the debate, I asked TV talk-show legend Dick Cavett if he thought CBS was taking a big gamble by bringing Colbert over from Comedy Central. Cavett answered, "If they are, it's probably the best gamble anybody ever took. I can't think of anybody more qualified, or if there ever has been anyone more qualified to do this show than Colbert." Here's what else he had to say...

5. I asked Al Franken about Colbert too, and he said: "I think Stephen is just brilliant, and I think every comedian and every satirist feels the same way. I think it's a great choice. It's going to be interesting to see him do it as himself. I mean, this is - and not in character." 



"He's going to have to really reinvent himself," I said.


"Well, and isn't that a great thing, to reinvent yourself?" said Franken, the "SNL" comedian turned senator.

6. What's it like to work for a cable news channel owned by the Chinese government? "We feel that it's important to include China in the mix in stories where China is relevant," Jim Spellman, a former CNN correspondent who now works for CCTV America, told me. Earlier, we had been talking about media coverage of the missing Malaysian Airlines plane.

"So the plane is absolutely relevant," he said. "Something like the Ukraine, the Chinese position is essentially nonintervention. So, that will be in some reports, but they aren't going to be driving the day-to-day of the story. We are more likely to include, say, them in context of the Security Council votes in the U.N. But we certainly are not given and I have never received any type of memo to, you know, reflect some sort of party line." Here's the full interview.


Hope you'll tune in next Sunday at 11 a.m. Eastern!

–Brian


Filed under: Reliable Sources
April 13th, 2014
01:38 PM ET

Money and power

Senator Al Franken discusses his opposition to the proposed merger between Comcast Time Warner and the influence that lobbyist money might have on the senators' scrutiny of the deal.


Filed under: Blog • Comcast • Time Warner Cable
April 13th, 2014
01:22 PM ET

The British are coming

A final thought from Brian Stelter about the influx of executives joining American media organizations from across the pond. Also, a look ahead to Monday's Pulitzer Prize announcement; should NSA reporting be honored?


Filed under: Reliable Sources
April 13th, 2014
01:16 PM ET

Not everyone loves Stephen Colbert

As Stephen Colbert is announced as David Letterman's replacement, Michelle Fields and Keli Goff debate the reaction to the pick on the left and the right.


Filed under: Blog • CBS • Comedy • David Letterman • Stephen Colbert
April 13th, 2014
01:04 PM ET

The Chinese perspective on MH-370

CCTV America correspondent Jim Spellman tells Brian Stelter how the state-run Chinese network has been covering the story of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.


Filed under: Blog • Reliable Sources
April 13th, 2014
12:58 PM ET

Cavett on Colbert

Talk show legend Dick Cavett joins Brian Stelter to give his take on what the Comedy Central veteran will bring to The Late Show.


Filed under: Blog • CBS • Stephen Colbert
April 13th, 2014
12:58 PM ET

More controversy at MSNBC

After the DNC accuses MSNBC of a double standard regarding their anchors' political activities, Brian Stelter and Frank Sesno analyze the left-leaning network's policy.


Filed under: Blog • Ed Schultz • Joe Scarborough • MSNBC
CNN announces new prime time lineup
April 10th, 2014
02:35 PM ET

CNN announces new prime time lineup

By Brian Stelter, CNN Senior Media Correspondent

Doubling down on its investment in original series, CNN will begin to devote the 9 p.m. hour of prime time to new taped shows starring Mike Rowe, Anthony Bourdain and others, the channel announced on Thursday.

The new strategy represents a shift away from the talk show format that CNN has featured at 9 p.m. for thirty years, first with "Larry King Live," then with "Piers Morgan Tonight." Morgan's program ended on March 29.

"We believe that genre is no longer viable" at that hour, the CNN Worldwide president Jeff Zucker said, citing "too many outlets" and "not enough unique guests."

Following the taped series at 9 p.m., a new addition called "CNN Tonight" at 10 p.m. will feature rotating hosts. It was described as "a live hour of the day's biggest stories."

Read more of Brian's CNNMoney article here. 

Posted by
Filed under: CNN
Stephen Colbert to succeed David Letterman as host of "The Late Show"
April 10th, 2014
12:55 PM ET

Stephen Colbert to succeed David Letterman as host of "The Late Show"

By Brian Stelter, CNN Senior Media Correspondent 

(CNN) – Stephen Colbert will succeed David Letterman as the host of "The Late Show," CBS announced on Thursday, one week after Letterman told his audience that he would retire sometime in 2015.

CBS said Colbert had signed a five-year contract to host the iconic late-night broadcast.

Colbert, 49, has been the host of Comedy Central's "The Colbert Report" since 2005.

Read the latest updates from Brian on CNN.com here. 

Posted by
Filed under: CBS • David Letterman • Stephen Colbert • The Late Show
« older posts