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February 1st, 2015
01:38 PM ET

'Reliable Sources:' February 1, 2015

Watch all the stories from Sunday's show:

After 400 days in an Egyptian prison, Al Jazeera correspondent Peter Greste is free. But two of his colleagues remain behind bars. CNN's Ian Lee has the latest from Cairo, and Al Jazeera English managing director Al Anstey has a message for the Egyptian authorities.

Words matter. So why do Obama administration officials and some in the press shy away from labels like "terrorists" and "Islamic terrorism?" Ahmed Shihab-Eldin and SE Cupp weigh in.

The first Super Bowl was televised by NBC and CBS - but neither network has the footage anymore! Jack Whitaker, a play-by-play announcer at that historic game, describes the on- and off-the-field rivalries.

There is one copy of the CBS telecast of Super Bowl I, discovered in a Pennsylvania attic many years ago, but it's in legal limbo. Steven Harwood, who represents the man who found the tape, explains the situation.

The "Fox News Primary" is underway for prospective Republican presidential candidates. How important is it, really? Gabriel Sherman and Matt Lewis offer 2 different points of view.

The future of media is being invented in Silicon Valley - and some of the inventors are pushing their bodies and their minds to the limit, as CNNMoney's Laurie Segall describes in this report, part of her series "Sex, Drugs and Silicon Valley."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
January 25th, 2015
05:05 PM ET

'Reliable Sources:' January 25, 2015

Watch all the stories from Sunday's show:

Should the news media name the perpetrators of mass shootings and show their faces? The parents of two Aurora, Colorado movie theater shooting victims say no. Tom and Caren Teves and Lonnie and Sandy Phillips explain their new campaign called 'No Notoriety.'

What should we believe about #DeflateGate? Former NFL players Chris Kluwe and Tim Green talk about what's at stake and how the current controversy arguably distracts from more serious scandals.

Is the media over-inflating the Patriots football story? L.Z. Granderson and Chris Villani weigh in.

How seriously should the political press take potential 2016 presidential candidates like Donald Trump and Sarah Palin? CNN senior legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin and The Washington Post's Robert Costa have two different answers.

"American Sniper keeps breaking box office records - and keeps generating controversy about the real-life story of Chris Kyle. Are movies supposed to be reliable sources? Veterans Paul Rieckhoff and Jonathan Gilliam say no - and they call the movie an important conversation-starter about the Iraq War.

Earlier this week, Amazon Studios revealed a plan to make or acquire a dozen original movies a year. In his first interview since the announcement, Amazon Studios chief Roy Price calls it a "middle ground" between traditional theatrical and all-digital movie releases.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
January 19th, 2015
11:41 AM ET

'Reliable Sources:' January 18, 2015

Watch all the stories from Sunday's show:

  · Former Charlie Hebdo writer Caroline Fourest speaks out; Frank Sesno joins the conversation about showing controversial Mohammed cartoons

  · The Intercept's Jeremy Scahill talks about using terrorists as anonymous sources and about what he calls a "circus of hypocrisy" among foreign leaders who claim to support a free press

  · Cartoonist Eli Valley and comedian Maz Jobrani discuss what happens when satire turns deadly serious

  · Elliott Abrams and Ahmed Shihab-Eldin on media portrayals of Jews and Muslims - and Fox's four apologies

  · Is there more to "Selma" being snubbed at the Oscars? Actor and activist Gbenga Akinnagbe says yes

  · Brian Stelter tours the memorial at Charlie Hebdo's office in Paris


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 27th, 2014
06:03 PM ET

Web exclusive: will Cuba loosen its grip on media and widen Internet access?

Does the renewing of diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba augur an flourishing of independent media and Internet access on the island? Brian Stelter asks New York Times editorial board member Ernesto Londoño, recently back from a trip to Havana, and OnCuba editor in chief Hugo Cancio.

"People desperately want the Internet and it seems clear to me that the state has used Internet access to control information fairly tightly," Londoño said.

He said the Cuban government has recently signaled that it wants to expand access.

"And if they keep their word, I think that could have a transformational effect," he said. "I think the more information that flows freely, the more Cubans will start debating and challenging the system. And I think that would have a very healthy impact."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
06:08 PM ET

Will anyone dare air 'The Interview?'

Famed defense lawyer Alan Dershowitz, Bold Films CEO Gary Michael Walters, and Variety co-editor in chief Andrew Wallenstein describe the consequences of the Sony cyber-attack and the postponement of the theatrical release of "The Interview."

A few of the highlights:

  · Dershowitz: "This dictator managed to do what no American president can do - that is, censor a film because of its content."

  · Dershowitz: "We must fight back, and the answer has to be, as it always is, if you try to censor, it will backfire. More people will see, more people will read, we will fight fire with fire."

  · Walters on Hollywood's reaction: It's crucial that Sony "not stand alone... the industry, law enforcement, the government needs to come together and formulate a common policy, because when America unites in a crisis, we're unstoppable."

  · Walters on the fate of the studio, which he is in business with: "I think it's like Mark Twain said - the rumors of Sony's demise are greatly exaggerated. They're a great company. They do a lot of great work."

  · Wallenstein on the potential release of the movie: "Sony wants to strike while the iron is hot. There's a lot of controversy generating publicity. They spent a lot of marketing money. I think they want to make it happen soon."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
06:01 PM ET

Hollywood legend Larry King on the Sony Pictures cyber-attack

"I think I agree with those who say this is only going to get worse. If this is in the hands of North Korea, imagine it in the hands of people with more technology than North Korea might have. I think this is a cause of grave concern."

–Former CNN host Larry King. He is now the host of "Larry King Now" on Ora TV.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
05:58 PM ET

Republican National Committee to movie theater owners: don't be bullied

Brian Stelter speaks with the RNC communications director Sean Spicer, who is calling on movie theater owners to show the controversial Sony comedy "The Interview."

Here's part of what Spicer said:

"This is not about the entertainment industry, and this is frankly not about this movie. I think what this comes down to is the very fiber of America. If we can be bullied into not releasing a movie, you have to ask, what's next? Is it an energy company? Is it a mom-and-pop small store that gets told don't show this? Is it someone who gets told you can't post a video to YouTube?

I think that we as Americans have a duty to stand up and show what we're all about when it comes to instances like this. Our view at the RNC was this was an opportunity. Somebody wanted to take away our freedom and so what we want to do is turn it into an opportunity to reward those who give our freedom.

And what we said to the studio and theater execs is show the movie and guarantee that a share of the profits go to military organizations like the USO and the Yellow Ribbon Fund to help show the rest of the world that America knows how to stand and fight."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
10:36 AM ET

Mark Cuban: Major hack will happen again

Some of billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban's emails to Sony Pictures were leaked by hackers. He tells Brian Stelter it will happen again.

An excerpt from the conversation:

STELTER: Do you think that will profoundly change in Hollywood as a result of this hack?

CUBAN: Not until the next one. And there will be a next one.

STELTER: It takes one more to change...?

CUBAN: Yes, because everybody will think, 'Look, that's not going to happen to me.' It happens. Right. It can't - that's just the way people think.

And now that the hack has gotten so much notoriety and it's had such an impact, you know, that's a chip for any hacker. That's a 'trophy hack,' and people - hackers are going to want more trophy hacks just to put the trophy on their mantle.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
10:02 AM ET

North Korea threatens more cyber-attacks

The top story from Sunday's program: CNN correspondent Kyung Lah reports on North Korea's latest statement, and Hollywood executive Gary Michael Walters describes his concerns about the movie industry's reactions to the cyber-attack against Sony Pictures.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 14th, 2014
05:30 PM ET

Student source for Rolling Stone's disputed UVA rape story speaks out

Alex Pinkleton is a University of Virginia student, a rape survivor, and a friend of Jackie, the subject of Rolling Stone's disputed article "A Rape on Campus." She speaks with Brian Stelter about discrepancies in Jackie's story and her anger at the writer of the Rolling Stone article, Sabrina Rubin Erdely.

"I think that she should have fact-checked, and I'm really upset and angry, like a lot of people are, that that didn't happen and now we're in a very difficult situation," Pinkleton said.

Pinkleton said that Erdely has tried to contact her since controversy erupted over the article, but that she has declined to speak with Erdely.

"I think her intentions were good," Pinkleton said. "I just think that the job was done poorly, and I am upset with that aspect of it, but I also know that she was trying to come from a point of advocacy. But as a reporter, you can't be like an advocate and support a story and listen to it and think everything is true and then report on it without trying to figure out if it's true. My job as an advocate was never to question Jackie's story or question the details, because I didn't need to. But the role that she's in as a reporter, she needed to do that."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
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