Sunday, July 27

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

November 24th, 2012
12:39 PM ET

Sneek Peak at this Sunday's Show

By Jamie Gray

On the show this Sunday, Bob Cusack of The Hill, Amy Argetsinger of the Washington Post and American University’s Jane Hall will examine the media’s fascination with the David Petraeus affair; have journalists given it attention to the detriment of more significant stories like the fiscal cliff negotiations? Also up for discussion, all those conservative pundits who predicted a Romney victory; should there be consequences for getting it so wrong?

Author and veteran military reporter Tom Ricks will join Howie to talk about David Petraeus and his relationship with the media before his downfall. Eric Deggans of the Tampa Bay Times will discuss his views on the way the media handles race. Finally, Jezebel Editor-in-chief Jessica Coen will tell us how her website exposed a collection of racist Tweets posted in reaction to President Obama’s re-election.

This Sunday, 11am ET.

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    November 27, 2013 at 11:33 pm | Reply
  2. Concerned Parent

    I agree with Jessica Coen in that some, but not all, of the anti Obama posts are entirely inappropriate and offensive. However, I found that Jessica's approach to the subject of "offensive and even racist speech" is a little lopsided. If you went on Twitter during the campaigning, there were many offensive, reverse racist and horribly crass posts also against Romney, but Jessica fails to mention that. There were a lot of threats against Romney, in fact. A collection of them can be found here: http://twitchy.com/2012/10/13/more-obama-supporters-threaten-to-kill-romney-if-he-becomes-president/

    On the subject of racism itself, there exists a double standard of sorts. Take, for example, the idea of the term "white boy" which is pretty regularly spoken in many non-white circles. If the term "black boy" were just as spoken in white circles, it would immediately be horribly offensive. It's perfectly acceptable for some non-white people to call one another slurs and epithets, but for a white person to do the same, suddenly it's a horrible offense. I've noticed that a lot of non-white people get a free pass in general on issues of racism, but the focus and blame of the subject of racism falls squarely on the shoulders of white people. In other words, without trying to sound too racist, whenever we here about racism, it's always about a white person being offensive towards a non-white person. Racism exists in all races. White people aren't the only racists in the world, but even if it were the case, and it were assumable that when we say "racist" we are universally talking about the offender being white, then the use of the term racist would then be racist because it would only be referring to people of the white race. Hence, again the double standard. I submit that use of the R word, "racist", is just as demonstrably racist as use of the N word, the C word (cracker), the H word (honky), the G word (gringo), the P word (peckerwood), the other R word (redneck), among many, many others and toward every culture.

    If we are going to discuss the issue of racism, the playing field must be level. Take for example, a Caucasian person in any other country of predominately any other race, say, in the middle east or Latin America or Asia or Africa. Sure, you can always find someone who went there and didn't experience any sort of racism, but if you go behind the scenes and even sometimes blatantly out front, you can't tell me there doesn't exist there some amount racism. There would most certainly be. So, it is just as reasonable to assume, that in some less diverse areas of our country, and from people that are from those less diverse areas, there also exists a similar expectation of racism to a similar degree. People are people where ever you go. Into the slums of Harlem, racism exists. In the backwoods of Tennessee, racism exists. In Bangkok, racism exists. In Chihuahua Mexico, racism exists. In Abu Dhabi, racism exists. Bigotry exists in many forms and every culture pretty evenly. It's not just exclusively Republican or Democrat, or black, brown, yellow, red or white. My point here is to illustrate the one-sided reporting of racism, especially about Obama. It was a campaign. People often said derogatory things in both directions. That's the nature of mudslinging. We can live with that. What we should expect with respect to reporting on racism, is that both sides of the story will be told. When it isn't, it has just as damaging of an effect as the racism itself.

    November 25, 2012 at 1:21 pm | Reply
  3. JG Long

    It was hardening to hear Howie try to humiliate and demeaned Jessica Coen, Jezebel Editor-in-chief, about what she reported to school authorities about the races and hateful comments that white American students published as an outcry against a Black President. His expression condoned that it is acceptable that white races kids express their hate on tweeter. He tried to chastise her for being a real American citizen that saw public racial hate, no matter how young, and decided to act as an American countrywoman. His interview was disingenuous and showed his personal racial prejudice. Those are his children and their comments are a direct reflection of what their parents’ perception and feelings about the United States President and race. His comment that these are just kids, saids “no big deal”, is why we are faced with an extreme killing and shooting of American citizen, including members of Congress. These “ Just kids” starts at 15 with hate comments on tweeter and end up at 19 or 25 year-old as mass killers of Americans, such as: Columbine High School, Chardon High School, North Lake College, Virginia Tech, Perry Hall High, Texas community college or the Colorado movie shooting. When they become older, then he can report on his show that the shooter was one of the 15 yr. old kids that tweeted racial comments about the President 2012. The kids he’s trying to protect are ones that will grow up and become adults without limits and will cause harm to innocent Americans, more specific, non-white Americans. I don’t think he realize the power of his comments and his contribution to continued hate crimes by minors. I think he should apologies to Ms. Coen for attaching her for her American citizenship and then retract publicly his acceptance or condoning of racial expression by young impressible mines that adults like him can influence.

    November 25, 2012 at 1:01 pm | Reply
  4. John Markum

    #1 Re: no repercussions for political pundits whose predictions were significantly off
    I noticed that you aired only Republican pundits who were off the mark. In case you didn't notice, many Democratic pundits were equally off by predicting a much closer election than it was (relative to the electoral college). Why no air-time for them?
    Also, I'd like to point out that weathermen/"meteorologists" at NOAA are very often wrong and still keep their jobs. And, to add insult to injury, all taxpayers involuntarily pay them whereas the political pundits are being paid by private citizens of their own volition.

    #2 Re: Jessica Coen going after teenagers who posted racist tweets about Barack Obama
    Is Ms. Coen going to do a followup on racist tweets by blacks? They do exist in case you aren't aware. And, if she does do one, will you air it?
    Racist drivel exists on all sides and, unfortunately, always will as long as every American, including the terminally stupid, have the right to free speech. Did you and Ms. Coen forget that in your quest for the moral high ground of political correctness?

    You present yourself as an impartial journalist but this show's content betrays you. You're acting like just another hack political commentator looking for ratings. Shame on you, Howard. For a while, I thought you were better than that.

    November 25, 2012 at 12:41 pm | Reply
  5. batjones

    I just watched Mr. Ricks apologia for General Petreaus. I have nothing to dispute that General Petraeus was a great military officer. However, the reports of his affair with Mrs Broadwell speak to a serious flaw toward his service as a central intelligence executive. Mr. Ricks wants us to ignore the affair and realize that these types of relationships regularly occur. This is an excellent exercise for us to engage.

    I do not know if the General has children, but let us consider that the daughter of General Petreaus sends threatening emails to General Allen regarding his friendship with Mrs Kelley. These emails are sent under the false name – StopKelley. These emails also identify past and future meetings that General Allen and Mrs Kelley have arranged. Beyond the emails, the daughter steps out in public and asserts that the cause for the attack against the Benghazi mission was to free previously unannounced prisoners.

    It seems to me the actions of this daughter of General Petreaus is a security risk that was caused because of the close relationship of General Petreaus. It is apparent that General Petreaus could not control the actions of his loved one and needed to step aside to protect the integrity of the country's security. There are hundreds of other men and women with the same qualifications and different qualifications to fill the role. Allen Dulles was a lawyer. George Bush, Sr. was a diplomat. Robert Gates was a career intelligence officer and public servant. America has a deep bench. If the General wanted to play with fire then he should have carried an extinguisher,so he would not get burned.

    November 25, 2012 at 12:16 pm | Reply

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