April 20 at 11am ET

Sharyl Attkisson explains her resignation; Glenn Greenwald's first interview since Pulitzer announcement; Aereo’s CEO Chet Kanojia previews Supreme Court case.
March 15th, 2013
08:08 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

For a show that considers itself a family, NBC's “Today” has been ripped apart in the media for its poor handling of Ann Curry's departure. Many have blamed current co-host Matt Lauer, who remarkably kept silent through the entire ordeal... until now. Lauer broke his silence earlier this week during an interview with Howard Kurtz, where he shared his feelings on the matter. Lauren Ashburn, Editor-in-chief of Daily-Download.com, and Adam Buckman, TV columnist for Xfinity, join Howie to discuss.

Following weeks of media speculation and hours of pundits predicting who would fill Pope Benedict's famous red shoes, millions of viewers watched as Vatican City announced the arrival of Pope Francis, formerly Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina. But before it was announced, TV anchors couldn't decide if the smoke was black or white (the latter signalling the Conclave's approval of a new pope). Howie invites New York Times religion correspondent Laurie Goodstein and The Washington Post's Sally Quinn to the table, where they'll assess the media's coverage of the pope.

CNN’s Washington Correspondent Jake Tapper also swings by the studio to chat with Howie about continuing tensions between the White House and reporters, as well as his new show, The Lead, which debuts Monday, March 18.

It's been 10 years since American troops entered Iraq, and ultimately 10 years of non-stop war coverage... but what lessons have we learned? The Washington Post's senior correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran and Time magazine's Mark Thompson will share their experiences covering the war and debate the media's shortcomings with Howie and former NBC News Senior Correspondent Fred Francis.

Tune in this Sunday, 11 E.T.

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Filed under: International • Iraq • Media • Media Criticism • Pope Francis • Reliable Sources • Sneak Peek • The Lede
soundoff (4 Responses)
  1. NYC Fitness Events

    "NBC's “Today” has been ripped apart in the media for its poor handling of Ann Curry's departure" Of course they are all friends. No one is going to talk bad about there friend's

    February 2, 2014 at 12:37 pm | Reply
  2. mario quevillon

    How can i review the video of Annmarie Timmins on depression>?

    March 24, 2013 at 1:12 pm | Reply
  3. ladyatheist

    I don't think I've seen anyone consider the possibility that reporters for the national media mainly live in New York and Washington, D.C., the two cities hit on 9/11. I think they rolled over on the issue of Iraq because of PTSD from living through 9/11. I moved to DC in 2002 and some of my friends had total knee-jerk reactions to going after Saddam without any rational thought about actual evidence. I could plainly see that the "evidence" was trumped up, but my friends who had lived through 9/11 in DC couldn't.

    March 17, 2013 at 12:56 pm | Reply
  4. Cparker

    This is "my" reason for stopping watching the Today show...I use to love Matt back when Katie was on the show. Then as time went on I saw Matt going from being humble to arrogant. It really showed when Meredith came on the show. Also (I am drawing a blank on the weather guy) but after his operation I saw him changing and then him and Matt would constantly would insult the women or put them down. Think about it...Katie left, Meredith left then Currie left, why is that? That was no family and I just got sick of watching what those two guys did to the women on the show. I now watch Good Morning America...they respect the women on the show, they give you the feeling they are equal, they have fun and not one of the Men are stuck on themselves and think they are God all Mighty. If you want me back watching the Today show, get rid of Matt! I also think this "holy then now" attitude comes from the TOP as well.

    March 17, 2013 at 11:43 am | Reply

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