Sunday, July 27

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

July 28th, 2013
01:40 PM ET

Anthony Weiner media circus

Errol Louis and Lois Romano speak with guest host Frank Sesno on the week's coverage of Anthony Weiner's latest sex scandal.

July 28th, 2013
01:39 PM ET

Royal baby media frenzy

Catherine Mayer, Tim Ewart and Joe Concha join guest host Frank Sesno to discuss the media frenzy surrounding the birth of His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis.


Filed under: Media • Media Criticism • Royal Baby
July 28th, 2013
01:30 PM ET

Al Jazeera’s American challenge

Guest host Frank Sesno talks to former Al Jazeera English anchor David Marash about the challenges ahead of Al Jazeera America’s August launch in the U.S.

July 28th, 2013
01:29 PM ET

End the White House press briefing?

Guest host Frank Sesno speaks with Reid Cherlin about the pros and cons of the Washington ritual known as the White House press briefing.

July 28th, 2013
01:29 PM ET

The Netflix juggernaut

With 14 Emmy nominations for their original programming, how is Netflix affecting the way we watch television? Guest host Frank Sesno invites Mario Armstrong and Peter Rubin to discuss.


Filed under: Arrested Development • Chromecast • Emmy Awards • Emmy Nominations • Emmys • Google • HBO • House of Cards • Netflix • Orange Is The New Black
July 28th, 2013
01:29 PM ET

Frank’s final thoughts

Guest host Frank Sesno offers his take on the highs and lows of the week - the Associated Press' analysis of the deadly train crash in Spain and of the media's coverage (or lack thereof) of Iraq.


Filed under: Associated Press • Final Thoughts • Iraq • Media • Media Criticism
July 26th, 2013
02:16 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

Frank Sesno, director of George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs, joins Reliable Sources this week as our guest host. As a former CNN Washington bureau chief, he's got an exciting show planned for Sunday - including Al Jazeera landing in America and the media's focus on Anthony Weiner.

When Anthony Weiner left Congress in disgrace following a sexting scandal in 2011, most critics believed his political career was effectively finished. Little did we know that Weiner would return to the political limelight in the form of a New York City mayoral race. Politico's Lois Romano and NY1's Errol Louis join Sesno to discuss what role Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin, plays in the coverage and whether the media are making too big a deal about the new, never-before-seen sexting pictures that were released earlier this week by TheDirty.com.

Next, ITV News Royal Correspondent Tim Ewart, Mediaite's Joe Concha and Time magazine's Europe Editor Catherine Mayer stop by the studio to share their insight into the British royal baby media debacle - was the wall-to-wall coverage justified? And does American really care about a new born baby across the pond?

Al Jazeera America is set to launch next month, and with it comes questions yet unanswered by the Qatar-based media network, including who will drive the editorial content and whether it will truly be an independent news organization? Former Al Jazeera English anchor David Marash joins Sesno to share his thoughts on their expansion into the States.

It's time to end the White House press briefings - at least that's what former White House Assistant Press Secretary Reid Cherlin wants you to believe. In a New Republic article, Cherlin argues that "The daily briefing has become a worthless chore for reporters, an embarrassing nuisance to administration staff, and a source of added friction between the two camps." Cherlin joins Sesno to discuss his recent article in the magazine.

Finally, Netflix stock may have dipped but its subscriber base is larger than ever. While some question its ability to produce truly originally programming, 14 Emmy nominations certainly seems to cinch their spot in TV programming history. Wired magazine's Peter Rubin and HLN Digital Lifestyle Expert Mario Armstrong will discuss the Emmy nominations, why Netflix is so popular and where they see the video streaming site's business model moving in the future.

Tune in this Sunday at 11am ET.

What we're reading this week
July 25th, 2013
05:41 PM ET

What we're reading this week

By Sara Fischer, CNN

The New York Times debuts its first “Times Documentary”

In April 2012, the New York Times published a five-part series of articles written by New York Times published reporter John Branch, illustrating the reality of the cultural pressures surrounding a girls' basketball team, Carroll Academy, a juvenile court-run school in Huntingdon, Tennessee. The sports editor of the New York Times received an overwhelming amount of public support for them team following the series being published. In response to the reaction, Branch revisited the team, the “Lady Jaguars,” to write two more articles, highlighting the community struggling with “high unemployment, teen pregnancy and rampant methamphetamine and prescription drug abuse.” The New York Times decided to turn Branch’s stories into a 17-minute documentary, the first “Times documentary”-branded video that the traditionally print-based publication has ever produced. The Huffington Post discusses the role of documentaries in telling a traditional print-story and how it changes the consumption of the story for its’ viewers.

Buzzfeed discovers the "Smartest Ever Ad Campaign to use National Flags"

Grande Reportagem, a Portuguese news magazine, hired a Lisbon-based ad agency called DraftFCB to create a simple yet effective print ad campaign that is geared to represent humanitarian struggles worldwide through the imagery of various country’s flags. For example, an image of the United States represents American’s knowledge (or lack there of) of the Iraq War. The blue space represents the number of Americans who do not know what the Iraq War is, in comparison the red space which represents those in favor of the War, and the white space, those opposed. While the statistical representations are not completely accurate, due to the rough-to-scale proportions of the flags images, they do a great job of informing the viewer of the general disparities in human conditions worldwide.

New York officials are investigating Bloomberg reporters' access to to consumers information

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's office is investigating how much access Bloomberg LP news reporters may have had to the company’s customers. “The probe follows inquiries made in May by the U.S. Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury into Bloomberg customer data access,” The Wall Street Journal reports. The article also discusses the issue of reporters' knowledge about client activities in a wider context describing how the issue first came about in 2012 when “officials complained to Bloomberg about reporters' access to bankers and traders' whereabouts and log in data, which the firm felt was a violation of its employees' privacy."

July 21st, 2013
01:30 PM ET

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Former MP addresses Murdoch Inquiry

Rupert Murdoch agrees to face Members of Parliament again as the investigation into News Corp continues.  David sits down with former MP Louise Mensch who once grilled Murdoch and now writes a column for the Sun.


Filed under: Leveson Inquiry • News Corp • Phone Hacking • Rupert Murdoch
July 21st, 2013
01:29 PM ET

Zimmerman verdict sparks debate

Callie Crossley, Eric Deggans, Ron Brownstein and David Folkenflik look back at how the media handled Zimmerman verdict and the ensuing debate about race and the justice system.


Filed under: Barack Obama • Blog • George Zimmerman • Race • Reliable Sources • Trayvon Martin
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