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August 30th, 2013
03:46 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

New York Times' media reporter Brian Stelter returns to host our show this week and he's brought with him a slew of great media topics to discuss. Since Sunday's still a few days away, though, here's a sneak peek to whet your appetite.

CNN's Frederik Pleitgen will be kicking off our show in Beirut with an update on the situation in Syria. Jumping back across the ocean to Washington D.C., our show will turn to the media's coverage of the Syrian civil war. The Huffington Post's Michael Calderone, The Daily Caller's Matt Lewis and Al Monitor's Foreign Policy Reporter Laura Rozen join Stelter in the studio to discuss how the media's coverage of the Iraq War might be shaping the coverage of the Syrian war, and ultimately, America's opinion of the war-ravaged region.

Then, The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald joins the show for an update on the NSA leak story and why it has become the story of the summer.

Keith Olbermann, formely of ESPN, MSNBC and Current TV, returned to ESPN this week with a new show. Deadspin's Tim Burke will weigh in on the anchor's 16-year hiatus from his first debut on the sports network, how Olbermann has changed and what he has planned for his new late-night show.

Finally, BuzzFeed's Whitney Jefferson swings by to assess the media circus surrounding Miley Cyrus' recent VMA performance.

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.

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Filed under: Civil War • ESPN • Glenn Greenwald • Keith Olbermann • Miley Cyrus • NSA • Sneak Peek • Syria • Twerking
What we're reading this week...
August 29th, 2013
06:12 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Elizabeth Cherneff, CNN

We’ve got a busy show planned this Sunday when Brian Stelter of the New York Times returns to guest host ‘Reliable Sources.’ We’ll discuss the latest coverage out of Syria amid rising tensions in the region, but until then, here are some other stories that caught our attention this week:

‘Why bloggers fell for a fake TechCrunch story about self-driving cars’ Slate’s Will Oremus took note of a recent TechCrunch story titled ‘Dispatch from the Future: Uber to Purchase 2,500 Driverless Cars From Google.’ Only problem? The post, complete with a July 25, 2023 dateline, was fictional. That didn’t stop some journalists, who tweeted, blogged and incorporated the post into their stories as though it were factual. While Google announced its plans to invest $258 million in the car-service mobile app earlier this month, it appears that, for now, entire fleets of driverless cars are still a phenomenon of the future.

‘Murdoch to purchase Los Angeles winery’

He’s one of the most well-known media moguls in the world, and Rupert Murdoch is now adding wineries to his list of acquisitions. Politico reports this week that Murdoch is in the process of closing a $28.2 million deal to buy a combo estate/vineyard in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. Spanning 13 acres and 7,500 square feet, the property was originally owned and built by Victor Fleming, director of Hollywood classics like ‘The Wizard of Oz’ and ‘Gone With the Wind.’

‘Will this be the tweet heard ‘round the world?’ The Washington Post’s Dominic Basulto speculates what Twitter can learn from Facebook’s 2012 IPO amid rumors that the social media giant could also go public in 2014. He notes that if/when and IPO should arise, Twitter would join other publicly traded media companies like Google, Instagram, and Linked In. Basulto writes that as social media companies expand, so does Wall Street’s influence and a subsequent focus on mobile platforms to generate revenue.

‘Elmore Leonard talks writing in never-before-seen videos’

Famed crime/suspense novelist Elmore Leonard passed away August 20, but his writing expertise is the focus of several never-before seen videos. In two videos, Buzzfeed highlights Leonard’s 10 rules for writers. His tips range from lighthearted to serious, including ‘try not to show off with your writing,’ and ‘try to leave out the parts that writers skip.’ Over his lifetime, 26 of Leonard’s books were adapted into screenplays.

‘No, ‘twerk’ and ‘selfie’ have not been added to the Oxford English Dictionary’ ‘Twerk’ was the word of the week after Miley  Cyrus’ over-the-top VMA’s performance, but the word caught people’s attention for another reason, too. Critics were quick to point out that ‘twerk’, among other words, was not added to the Oxford English Dictionary, but added to the separate entity, Oxford Dictionaries Online. Multiple media pundits were quick to pick up on the error, but not before several outlets misreported the additions. Among other notable words added to Oxford Dictionaries Online were ‘selfie,’ ‘emoji’, and ‘food baby.’

Tune in Sunday at 11a EDT

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Filed under: Blog • BuzzFeed • Media • Reliable Sources • Rupert Murdoch • Twitter • What we're reading
August 25th, 2013
06:03 PM ET

The media and the march

Dan Rather, Joseph Torres & Paul Delaney join guest host Eric Deggans to discuss the media's coverage of the civil rights movement and how it affects the media's coverage of race today.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • Media • Media Criticism • Race • The March on Washington
August 25th, 2013
02:00 PM ET

Race issues and the media

Brian Beutler, Don Lemon Charles Blow and guest host Eric Deggans on the media’s attempts to cover racial issues fairly.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • Media • Media Criticism • Race
August 25th, 2013
01:56 PM ET

Al Jazeera’s first week

David Zurawik and Mohammed el Nawawy join guest host Eric Deggans to discuss the Qatar-based network’s Stateside debut.


Filed under: Al Jazeera • Al Jazeera America • Eric Deggans • Media • Media Criticism
August 25th, 2013
01:55 PM ET

ESPN pulls out of PBS partnership

Former ESPN ombudsman Kelly McBride and guest host Eric Deggans on the NFL’s alleged pressure on ESPN to pull out of a documentary partnership with PBS that focused on NFL head injuries.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • ESPN • Football Head Injuries • Frontline • New York Times • NFL • PBS
August 25th, 2013
01:55 PM ET

The reporter who found “The Butler”

Washington Post reporter Wil Haygood sits down with guest host Eric Deggans to talk about his journey to find “The Butler" and how his article inspired the new hit movie.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • Lee Daniels • The Butler • Washington Post
August 25th, 2013
01:48 PM ET

Eric Deggans’ final thought

Our guest host’s final thoughts on race baiting in the media and how to change the status quo.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • Media • Media Criticism • Race
When racial clichés drive murder stories
August 24th, 2013
06:48 PM ET

When racial clichés drive murder stories

By Eric Deggans, Special to CNN

Editor's note: Eric Deggans is joining National Public Radio as TV critic after many years as TV and media critic at the Tampa Bay Times. He is the author of "Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation." Deggans is guest-hosting "Reliable Sources" on Sunday at 11 a.m. ET. Follow him on Twitter @Deggans

(CNN) – As scores of people head to the National Mall this week commemorating 50 years since the March on Washington, some corners of the media are still featuring passionate debate over whether African-Americans have ignored "a culture of violence" in their midst.

The finger pointing this time comes after the senseless killing of Australian baseball player and college student Christopher Lane, shot dead August 16 while jogging on a street in Duncan, Oklahoma.

From the moment three teenagers were arrested in the crime - first misidentified as three black youths, later found to be two African-Americans and one white guy - some media outlets tried to draw comparisons to the killing last year of black teenager Trayvon Martin by neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman.

But if Lane's death has anything in common with Martin's - besides the sad fact that both killings seemed avoidable and were possibly committed by people of a different race from the victim's - it's the sometimes sloppy reporting used to make points about race that deserve subtler, more precise treatment.

Read more of Eric's article here.


Filed under: Chris Lane • Eric Deggans
August 23rd, 2013
05:14 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Sara Fischer, CNN

There’s a lot to discuss on ‘Reliable Sources’ this Sunday with our guest host, Eric Deggans, TV and media critic for the Tampa Bay Times and future TV critic for NPR.

We’ll start by taking a look at the coverage of the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. Additionally, we will discuss the media coverage of American civil rights with longtime CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather, along with Senior External Affairs Director of Free Press, Joseph Torres and Founding Member of the National Association of Black Journalists, Paul Delaney.

Also on the show, we’ll speak with a Brian Beutler, political writer for Salon and New York Times Columnist Charles Blow about whether the media has been hyping the national race discussion and the fairness of its’ coverage.

We’ll also invite panelists David Zurawik, television and media critic for The Baltimore Sun and Mohammed el Nawawy, author and professor at Queens University of Charlotte to give their take on the launch of Al Jazeera America this week.

Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute will also join us to discuss ESPN’s decision to pull its logo and credit from "Frontline's" upcoming documentary about the controversial subject of sports and brain injury.

Lastly, we will chat with Wil Haygood, columnist for The Washington Post, who first reported on veteran White House butler Eugene Allen, the man who served as the inspiration for Lee Daniel's new film, "The Butler."

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.


Filed under: Al Jazeera • Al Jazeera America • Civil Rights • ESPN • March on Washington • NFL • Race • Sneak Peek • The Butler • Washington Post
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