Sunday, July 27

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

August 23rd, 2013
05:14 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Sara Fischer, CNN

There’s a lot to discuss on ‘Reliable Sources’ this Sunday with our guest host, Eric Deggans, TV and media critic for the Tampa Bay Times and future TV critic for NPR.

We’ll start by taking a look at the coverage of the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. Additionally, we will discuss the media coverage of American civil rights with longtime CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather, along with Senior External Affairs Director of Free Press, Joseph Torres and Founding Member of the National Association of Black Journalists, Paul Delaney.

Also on the show, we’ll speak with a Brian Beutler, political writer for Salon and New York Times Columnist Charles Blow about whether the media has been hyping the national race discussion and the fairness of its’ coverage.

We’ll also invite panelists David Zurawik, television and media critic for The Baltimore Sun and Mohammed el Nawawy, author and professor at Queens University of Charlotte to give their take on the launch of Al Jazeera America this week.

Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute will also join us to discuss ESPN’s decision to pull its logo and credit from "Frontline's" upcoming documentary about the controversial subject of sports and brain injury.

Lastly, we will chat with Wil Haygood, columnist for The Washington Post, who first reported on veteran White House butler Eugene Allen, the man who served as the inspiration for Lee Daniel's new film, "The Butler."

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.


Filed under: Al Jazeera • Al Jazeera America • Civil Rights • ESPN • March on Washington • NFL • Race • Sneak Peek • The Butler • Washington Post
What we're reading this week...
August 23rd, 2013
10:49 AM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

August may be a slow month for news, but Reliable's got a jam-packed show for you on Sunday with guest host Eric Deggans of The Tampa Bay Times. We'll be looking at the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the media's coverage of race-related issues and the launch of Qatar-based Al Jazeera America. Until then, check out what the Reliable staff is reading now.

Call me Chelsea: Three years have passed since Bradley Manning released hundreds of thousands of military papers. Still to be determined? How Manning's actions will affect the safety of Americans or the secrecy of the government. Manning was sentenced last week, convicted of 20 of 22 counts and sentences to 35 years in prison. In a recent twist, however, Manning released a statement on Thursday requesting news outlets refer to him/her as Chelsea Manning going forward. "I am a female. Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible," Manning said in a statement read on the Today show. So what should news organizations do?

Netflix can read your mind: With the aid of algorithms that could rival online dating websites, Netflix is now combing its users' video queue with its famous "Based on your viewing history" suggestion service. Users will now see suggestions based on what they've watched in the past, in addition to the star rating system associated with each movie. "The idea is to show users 'titles you’re most likely to want to watch right up front,' Netflix product executive Michael Spiegelman said, in a blog post introducing the change," explained the AllThingsD article. So be careful what you pick, because it just might appear on your Netflix homepage now - and it might be something you're embarrassed to be seen watching.

He said, she said: Mother Jones reportedly published a headline quoting Aaron Sorkin blasting The Huffington Post, which read  "Aaron Sorkin in Washington, DC: The Huffington Post Sucks.' Sorkin has come forward and claims he was not only not misquoted, but the quote was entirely fabricated. The author of the article has since responded to the Politico article about the alleged misquote, saying "he wrote the original headline and that Sorkin was definitely expressing his dislike of the Huffington Post."