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What we're reading this week...
September 27th, 2013
11:47 AM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Sara Fischer, CNN

We’ve got an exciting show this week featuring coverage of the potential government shutdown, 'Breaking Bad' and the Food Network with returning guest host Brian Stelter, media and TV reporter for the New York Times, but until then; here’s a look at what we’ve been reading this week.

Pinterest sees growing number of journalists using the site, makes related changes

The pin-board style photo-sharing website, Pinterest, is making changes to its’ digital platform in response to a surge in journalist users. As of Tuesday, Pinterest users can now pin articles, just as they would pin items of clothing, bath towels, or craft projects. Pinterest’s ability to drive high traffic is appealing to journalists and news organizations that want to expand their brand and engage their audiences more heavily.

Why we're shutting off our comments

Popularscience.com is shutting off their comments feature to readers because “comments can be bad for science.” Acknowledging that it wasn’t an easy decision to make, the website argues that posting comments are bad for the website and science alike, because certain comments can polarize readers and make them feel more negatively about the science being reported.

Comedian arrested after punching Journalist Josh Rogin at D.C.'s Funniest Celebrity Competition

Egos weren’t the only things that were bruised at this year’s D.C.’s Funniest Celebrity contest. The event headliner Dan Nainan got into a tiff with Newsweek’s front-man Josh Rogin this Saturday over tweets Rogin was sending in the middle of Nainan’s performance. Nainan couldn’t take the joke. He allegedly walked up to Rogin after the show and punched him in the face.

World's oldest newspaper to end print edition, go digital only

The future of print just got a little dimmer. Lloyd’s List, the world’s oldest newspaper announced this week that it would move to a digital-only platform. The publication, which was first printed in 279 years ago, is now cancelling its print circulation, citing a declining interest in the hard copy as the reason.

Could transparency bolster publishers efforts to adopt new revenue models?

WeatherFX, a weather website, has created a new data model that they believe other digital publishers should follow. While most digital publishers use traffic and engagement numbers to cater their products to their own audience, WeatherFX takes these same numbers and correlates them to consumer patterns of other products on the web. WeatherFX’s general Manager Vikram Somaya argues that small publishers that have a niche audience need to build a story around that audience, so that their data can reflect their audiences’ interests and needs.

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