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November 22nd, 2013
04:42 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show...

By CNN's Elizabeth Cherneff

Team Reliable Sources is happy to welcome back NPR TV critic Eric Deggans as our guest host this weekend!

First up on Sunday’s show, following separate apologies from MSNBC hosts Martin Bashir and Alec Baldwin this past week, we’ll discuss the broader impact on the cable channel with The Washington Post’s Erik Wemple and Amy Holmes, anchor for The Blaze.

Next we’ll turn our focus to Michigan’s Flint Journal newspaper, which apologized to readers after failing to realize/report that a candidate for city council was a convicted murder. Vincent Duffy, News Director of Michigan Radio, and Richard Prince of the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education will join guest host Eric Deggans for the discussion.

With Buzzfeed announcing the addition of an international women’s rights correspondent to its ranks, we’ll look at the need for a dedicated beat reporter on this front with Buzzfeed foreign editor Miriam Elder and Lauren Wolfe, Director of the Women Under Siege Project.

In the wake of Bloomberg reporter Michael Forsythe’s suspension and ensuing allegations of self-censorship, we’ll analyze the journalistic repercussions of the decision with The Atlantic’s James Fallows and The New York Times’ Christine Haughney.

And in our constantly changing media environment, we’ll talk to author Jeff Jarvis and NYU School of Journalism’s Jay Rosen (who will be joining Glenn Greenwald/Pierre Omidyar’s media venture) about how these start-ups will compete with more traditional media outlets.

Finally, we’ll discuss the notion that films with non-white casts are often seen as “race-themed”, regardless of subject matter, with our panel, Viviana Hurtado, founding editor of The Wise Latina Club, and Alyssa Rosenberg, features editor for ThinkProgress.org

Tune in Sunday at 11am EST.

What we're reading this week...
November 22nd, 2013
11:21 AM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

Welcoming back Eric Deggans to the guest host chair, the Reliable Sources team has a great show planned for you this week. We'll be discussing the PR nightmare that MSNBC is battling with Martin Bashir and Alec Baldwin, BuzzFeed's recent hire of an international women's rights reporter, and race-themed films, to name a few. In the meantime, here are some other stories that caught our attention this week... what caught yours?

'Rob Burgundy sings for his 'dear friend" Toronto Mayor Rob Ford'

Here on 'Reliable Sources,' we're big fans of the Channel 4 News Teams, so when we heard that the original Anchorman was swinging by the 'Conan' set, we had to tune in. But to our surprise, he didn't spout sexist comments or whip out his jazz flute to serenade the audience. Instead, he broadcast his support for his "dear, dear, dear friend, Mayor Rob Ford of Toronto."  Spoiler Alert: Burgundy has a sexy voice, so prepare yourself.

'Politico's Mike Allen, native advertising pioneer'

Native advertising, a system where an advertisement is seen within the context of a story, works out well for the company paying for the prime placement. Unfortunately for the news organization, trading page space for payment has become a somewhat controversial topic in the journalism industry, generating a discussion about the ethics involved. BuzzFeed and The Atlantic have recently come under fire for their uses of native advertising, and Politico's Mike Allen is the latest to receive criticism for the questionable use of the marketing scheme. Some fans of Allen, however, applaud his ability to weave advertisements into the folds of his stories, to the point where the two are indistinguishable from one another.

'The incredible story of Marion Stokes'

In the social media generation, we can sometimes take for granted the fact that we live in the era of YouTube - the most it takes to call up a video of the Iranian hostage crisis or Hurricane Katrina is a few taps of the keyboard and the click of a mouse. For those of an older generation, though, there's something poetic about popping in a VHS tape to re-live moments of history. One Philadelphia woman took it to the extreme, taping 35 years of "network, local, and cable news, in her home, one tape at a time, recording every major (and trivial) news event until the day she died in 2012 at the age of 83 of lung disease." Can you guess how many tapes she collected over the years?

For more media news, tune in Sunday at 11am ET.