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December 22nd, 2013
01:15 PM ET

The fall of “Duck Dynasty"?

Matea Gold, Lola Ogunnaike, Matt Lewis and Brian Stelter discuss the furor surrounding the suspension of rural reality show star Phil Robertson for controversial comments he made to GQ magazine.


Filed under: A&E • Duck Dynasty • reality tv
December 22nd, 2013
01:14 PM ET

Trial by social media

Michael Calderone, Ryan Lizza, Alicia Shepard and Brian Stelter weigh in on the social media mob reaction to one (former) PR executive’s offensive Tweet.


Filed under: Justine Sacco • Twitter
December 22nd, 2013
01:13 PM ET

Credibility crisis for “60 Minutes”?

After another 60 Minutes report gets panned, Michael Calderone, Ryan Lizza, Alicia Shepard and Brian Stelter look at what’s going wrong at the venerable CBS news magazine.


Filed under: 60 Minutes • CBS
December 22nd, 2013
01:12 PM ET

POLITICO expands past the Beltway

In the video above, Brian Stelter talks to POLITICO CEO Jim VandeHei about his company’s new media venture, Capital New York.


Politico, which has transformed coverage of Washington, D.C. personalities and policy-making, is now finding out if it can clone itself.

In the three months since acquiring a start-up news website in New York, called Capital, Politico has tripled the site's staff and focused in on three city- and state-size topics: City Hall, state government and the media. At the beginning of December, Capital formally relaunched with a new website design and a preview of a paid subscription service that is modeled after Politico's paid service.

Now Politico owner Allbritton Communications - and many competitors in Washington and New York - are watching to see whether readers and advertisers flock to the Empire State spin-off.

There could be more clones to come. "If it works [in New York], think about all the avenues that would open up for Politico," Jim VandeHei, the new chief executive of both Politico and Capital, said in an interview with CNN. "There's so many other areas that look a lot like New York or look a lot like a state that could be very attractive to Politico, and have a need for journalism."

VandeHei, like any careful CEO, declined to name any. But when asked if he had a third market in mind, he said "we have markets three, four and five in mind." Read more...


Filed under: Jim VandeHei • Politico
December 22nd, 2013
01:12 PM ET

China cracks down on foreign press

Jim Sciutto, Michael Calderone, Emily Parker, and Brian Stelter assess the reasons for the Chinese government’s recent harsh treatment of Western journalists.


Filed under: Censorship • China • Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2013
01:11 PM ET

Funny Media Moment of the Week

Host Brian Stelter shares one of the funny media moments you might have missed this week.


Filed under: Comedy • Conan O'Brien • Media
Western journalists' China visa dramas: Don't shoot the messenger
December 22nd, 2013
09:45 AM ET

Western journalists' China visa dramas: Don't shoot the messenger

 By Jaime A. FlorCruz, CNN

Editor's note: Jaime's China is a column about Chinese society and politics. Jaime FlorCruz has lived and worked in China since 1971. Now CNN's Beijing bureau chief, he studied Chinese history at Peking University (1977-81) and was TIME Magazine's Beijing correspondent (1982-2000).

Beijing (CNN) - Every December, foreign correspondents in China go through the rigmarole of renewing press cards and visas, which typically run out at the end of the year.

This time around, Chinese authorities held up renewing the credentials of roughly two dozen Bloomberg and New York Times reporters after the two American news outfits published muckraking stories about the wealth of the families of top Chinese leaders.

READ: China blocks website after report on Wen Jiabao's wealth

Without renewed press cards, they could not renew their Chinese visas. Without the visas, reporters and their families would be forced to leave China.

"5 Days Till Visa Expiry," New York Times reporter Andrew Jacobs, tweeted on Tuesday.

"Do you think hauling all my stuff to gates of the Foreign Ministry holding a tag sale will get their attention?"

Read more of the article here.


Filed under: Censorship • China • Media • Media Criticism