April 13 at 11am ET

Colbert to succeed Letterman on CBS; Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) on the Time Warner Cable/Comcast merger; A look at how Chinese media are covering the search for Flight MH370.
February 10th, 2014
11:53 AM ET

From Brian: 6 takeaways from Feb. 9 show

If you weren't able to tune in on Sunday, here were some of the moments that really stood out to me:

1. "Wherever you look, journalists are in the cross-hairs more than I have ever experienced, ever, in my career." –CNN chief international correspondent Christiane Amanpour. I spoke with her about Egypt's crackdown on journalists.

2. When Glenn Greenwald joined me to preview his new Web site, The Intercept, he hinted that Edward Snowden wouldn't be his only NSA source:

STELTER: Is it fair to say you've heard from people inside the NSA or inside the government who have been inspired by Edward Snowden, who are also feeling uncomfortable with what's going on inside the government and also want to share information with you?
GREENWALD: I definitely think it's fair to say that there are people who have been inspired by Edward Snowden's courage and by the great good and virtue that it has achieved and, you know, I think there were people before Edward Snowden like Chelsea Manning and Thomas Drake and before that Daniel Ellsberg who were incredibly heroic. I think Edward Snowden was inspired by them. I have no doubt there will be other sources inside the government who see extreme wrongdoing inspired by Edward Snowden as well.

Sure enough, on Monday morning Greenwald said one of the Web site's first stories "relies upon a new well-placed source, as well as new NSA documents from the Snowden archive."

3. I was a little bit surprised that Carl Bernstein included MSNBC host Joe Scarborough on a list of potential Republican presidential candidates. (Here's the video of the segment.) He was talking about how the scandals surrounding New Jersey Governor Chris Christie have "thrown the Republican presidential sweepstakes wide open:"

BERNSTEIN: Christie was the presumed nominee among the commentating class and many others. He no longer is under any circumstances. This means there's going to be a huge fight for the presidential nomination in the Republican Party, other candidates are going to enter, maybe people like Joe Scarborough, Rob Portman, many others, this is wide open.
STELTER: You think Scarborough would actually do it? He always flirts with this stuff. Do you think he'd actually run for president?
BERNSTEIN: I can't be inside his head. I think, though, that he certainly would think about it - and if he saw that there was a way and a path that was a possibility, that he probably would.

4. Carl Bernstein also signaled some skepticism about whether Hillary Rodham Clinton will run for president in 2016, as so many people presume: "There are some doubts, among those who know her well, that she's really going to do this. And she's not going to make a decision until we get much closer to the event."


5. With CNN commentators Sally Kohn and Will Cain, I brought up NBC's decision to truncate the International Olympic Committee president's anti-discrimination statement during the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics. Cain said he thought it was "definitely a mistake," but was unintentional.

Kohn added, "You have this subtext of NBC taking heat - as they should be - for broadcasting these Olympics that are happening in a country that has these incredibly vicious, atrocious anti-gay laws. A lot of people - myself included - don't think we should even be having the Olympics there at all." Here's our whole conversation - the Olympics come up at the end.

6. After the Winter Olympics end, the "Tonight Show" will have a new host. I asked Bill Carter, my former colleague at The New York Times, if he thinks NBC's decision to replace Jay Leno with Jimmy Fallon is a wise one: "I do think it's a good move. I think Fallon is a good talent, the right talent. Jay has said the same thing. I think - I do think he's the right guy."

Of course, Leno would stay on "Tonight" if he were asked, Carter said: "Jay never wants to stop working. But I do think he recognizes, 'OK, this makes sense; they've done it the right way.' He's supportive of Fallon. And I do think Fallon has a very good chance to be the number one guy."


Hope you'll tune in next Sunday at 11 a.m. Eastern!

–Brian


Filed under: Reliable Sources
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