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March 30th, 2014
01:22 PM ET

Flight 370 and the business of news

The Atlantic’s James Fallows and Andrew Beaujon of the Poynter Institute join Brian Stelter with their take on media lessons learned from three weeks of missing plane coverage.

March 30th, 2014
01:22 PM ET

Is there such a thing as too much plane news?

Too much plane coverage? Some people say yes. But a recent survey by the Pew Research Center found that "most Americans do not feel there has been too much coverage of the missing jetliner."

On Sunday's "Reliable Sources," Alan Murray, president of the Pew Research Center, discussed the survey as well as Pew's annual “State of the News Media” report. The report's headline: signs of hope for the beleaguered news business. You can read the full report here.

March 30th, 2014
01:20 PM ET

Flight 370: Managing the message

How should corporations like Malaysia Airlines manage the flow of information to the media and public while protecting their image? Veteran crisis communications specialist Carreen Winters joins us on "Reliable Sources" with her take.

March 30th, 2014
01:19 PM ET

Grading media coverage of Obamacare

The White House hit a milestone recently after reaching its goal to enroll 6 million people for health insurance - but how have journalists covered the highs and lows of the Obamacare rollout? Health care policy and political reporters Elise Viebeck and Sarah Kliff join us on "Reliable Sources" to discuss.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
March 30th, 2014
01:09 PM ET

Bloomberg editor quits after story spiked

Video from Sunday's "Reliable Sources:" Ex-Bloomberg editor Ben Richardson tells Brian Stelter why he decided to leave the company in response to the spiking of a story about hidden financial ties between the families of Chinese officials and a wealthy businessman. A spokesman for Bloomberg declined to comment on the story or on Richardson's resignation.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
March 30th, 2014
12:00 PM ET

Web Exclusive: extended interview with former Bloomberg editor Ben Richardson

In this extended "Reliable Sources" interview, Ben Richardson talks to Brian Stelter about the broader journalistic challenges of covering China.

Richardson, a longtime editor at Bloomberg News, recently resigned over what he called the "mishandling" of an investigative story about hidden financial ties between the families of Chinese officials and a wealthy businessman. A spokesman for Bloomberg declined to comment on the story or on Richardson's resignation.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
March 30th, 2014
10:20 AM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

Good morning! With Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 still the top story on CNN and elsewhere, what lessons have we learned about the media in these last three weeks of missing plane coverage? And what lessons have news organizations learned? I'll ask two guests at the very top of this week's "Reliable Sources:" James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic, and Andrew Beaujon, a media reporter and blogger at Poynter.

I'll also ask Alan Murray, the president of the Pew Research Center, about this Pew survey that showed about 60 percent of people feel news organizations are providing the proper amount of plane coverage - or not enough. About 33 percent said there's been too much coverage. Murray will also discuss the findings from this year's State of the News Media report by Pew.

I've also invited an expert in crisis communications and reputation management, Carreen Winters, to discuss Malaysia Airlines' P.R. missteps in the days and weeks since Flight 370 disappeared. Winters is an executive vice president at MWW Group.

And: this week Ben Richardson became the latest person to leave Bloomberg News in response to the spiking of an investigative story about China. He'll join me from Hong Kong to describe what happened. (Bloomberg has declined to comment on the matter.)

Turning to the week's big political news, I'll ask two of Washington's best health care policy and politics reporters about how the media approaches the Obama administration's health care overhaul, two days before the open enrollment deadline. Elise Viebeck, staff writer at The Hill, and Sarah Kliff, formerly of The Washington Post's Wonkblog and now a senior editor at Vox Media, will both be here in-studio.

Tune in at 11 a.m. Eastern!

–Brian


Filed under: Reliable Sources