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Why did the New York Times really sack its editor?
May 15th, 2014
06:18 PM ET

Why did the New York Times really sack its editor?

By Brian Stelter

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) - As a media reporter for the New York Times, I was acutely aware that executive editor Jill Abramson favored what she called "the story behind the story."

Articles that revealed what was really happening behind the scenes, beyond the on-the-record pleasantries of politics and corporate life, were rewarded with kudos from Abramson and front page placement.

You know where I'm going with this.

Today the news media world is collectively asking for the story behind the story of Abramson's sudden dismissal on Wednesday.

Abramson and the publisher of the Times, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., have not answered. But Sulzberger's decision to replace Abramson with her deputy, Dean Baquet, has been infused with meaning anyway, by anonymously-sourced stories, terse statements and outlandish claims.

I left the Times about six months ago. In all the coverage of Abramson's ouster, this quote, from New York magazine's account of what went wrong, rings truest: "It was just a lot of accumulated backbiting."

You can read Brian's full story here


Filed under: Blog • New York Times
soundoff (2 Responses)
  1. sstorves

    David Ross, You don't know what you are talking about. Discrimination and retaliation are illegal. It is fine for men to negotiate but if women try to negotiate, they get fired,....I know, because it happened to me..I hope she sues them and I wish her the best...

    May 18, 2014 at 12:00 pm | Reply
  2. David Ross

    Why do all people deserve the same pay for the same job? Does Mila Kunis make the same as George Clooney to act in a movie?

    This victim mentality is killing the country.

    You are worth what you negotiate and if you don't want to negotiate, hire an agent to do it for you.

    You don't deserve a compensation package just because you have a title

    May 17, 2014 at 7:32 am | Reply

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