.
December 22nd, 2014
06:08 PM ET

Will anyone dare air 'The Interview?'

Famed defense lawyer Alan Dershowitz, Bold Films CEO Gary Michael Walters, and Variety co-editor in chief Andrew Wallenstein describe the consequences of the Sony cyber-attack and the postponement of the theatrical release of "The Interview."

A few of the highlights:

  · Dershowitz: "This dictator managed to do what no American president can do - that is, censor a film because of its content."

  · Dershowitz: "We must fight back, and the answer has to be, as it always is, if you try to censor, it will backfire. More people will see, more people will read, we will fight fire with fire."

  · Walters on Hollywood's reaction: It's crucial that Sony "not stand alone... the industry, law enforcement, the government needs to come together and formulate a common policy, because when America unites in a crisis, we're unstoppable."

  · Walters on the fate of the studio, which he is in business with: "I think it's like Mark Twain said - the rumors of Sony's demise are greatly exaggerated. They're a great company. They do a lot of great work."

  · Wallenstein on the potential release of the movie: "Sony wants to strike while the iron is hot. There's a lot of controversy generating publicity. They spent a lot of marketing money. I think they want to make it happen soon."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
06:01 PM ET

Hollywood legend Larry King on the Sony Pictures cyber-attack

"I think I agree with those who say this is only going to get worse. If this is in the hands of North Korea, imagine it in the hands of people with more technology than North Korea might have. I think this is a cause of grave concern."

–Former CNN host Larry King. He is now the host of "Larry King Now" on Ora TV.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
05:58 PM ET

Republican National Committee to movie theater owners: don't be bullied

Brian Stelter speaks with the RNC communications director Sean Spicer, who is calling on movie theater owners to show the controversial Sony comedy "The Interview."

Here's part of what Spicer said:

"This is not about the entertainment industry, and this is frankly not about this movie. I think what this comes down to is the very fiber of America. If we can be bullied into not releasing a movie, you have to ask, what's next? Is it an energy company? Is it a mom-and-pop small store that gets told don't show this? Is it someone who gets told you can't post a video to YouTube?

I think that we as Americans have a duty to stand up and show what we're all about when it comes to instances like this. Our view at the RNC was this was an opportunity. Somebody wanted to take away our freedom and so what we want to do is turn it into an opportunity to reward those who give our freedom.

And what we said to the studio and theater execs is show the movie and guarantee that a share of the profits go to military organizations like the USO and the Yellow Ribbon Fund to help show the rest of the world that America knows how to stand and fight."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
10:36 AM ET

Mark Cuban: Major hack will happen again

Some of billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban's emails to Sony Pictures were leaked by hackers. He tells Brian Stelter it will happen again.

An excerpt from the conversation:

STELTER: Do you think that will profoundly change in Hollywood as a result of this hack?

CUBAN: Not until the next one. And there will be a next one.

STELTER: It takes one more to change...?

CUBAN: Yes, because everybody will think, 'Look, that's not going to happen to me.' It happens. Right. It can't - that's just the way people think.

And now that the hack has gotten so much notoriety and it's had such an impact, you know, that's a chip for any hacker. That's a 'trophy hack,' and people - hackers are going to want more trophy hacks just to put the trophy on their mantle.


Filed under: Reliable Sources
December 22nd, 2014
10:02 AM ET

North Korea threatens more cyber-attacks

The top story from Sunday's program: CNN correspondent Kyung Lah reports on North Korea's latest statement, and Hollywood executive Gary Michael Walters describes his concerns about the movie industry's reactions to the cyber-attack against Sony Pictures.


Filed under: Reliable Sources