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December 27th, 2014
06:03 PM ET

Web exclusive: will Cuba loosen its grip on media and widen Internet access?

Does the renewing of diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba augur an flourishing of independent media and Internet access on the island? Brian Stelter asks New York Times editorial board member Ernesto Londoño, recently back from a trip to Havana, and OnCuba editor in chief Hugo Cancio.

"People desperately want the Internet and it seems clear to me that the state has used Internet access to control information fairly tightly," Londoño said.

He said the Cuban government has recently signaled that it wants to expand access.

"And if they keep their word, I think that could have a transformational effect," he said. "I think the more information that flows freely, the more Cubans will start debating and challenging the system. And I think that would have a very healthy impact."


Filed under: Reliable Sources
soundoff (9 Responses)
  1. chrissy

    I really hope this helps the people of Cuba! They should be allowed free elections and dictatorship has long been proven to not work! And the embargo between our countries shouldve ended long ago! Cuba is a very beautiful country and i hope to be able to vacation there one day! I have never understood how the US govt could forbid the citizens here to visit Cuba BUT allow visitation to Mexico! Whats up with that???

    January 30, 2015 at 7:47 pm | Reply
  2. G Hornet

    Wake up moalta! Wake up! Most Cubans, in and out of Cuba were born after castro stole power in Cuba. A huge percentage were born after Batista's death. I was born after Batista's death, and I am not young any more, I cannot be Batista's friend, I never met him nor lived under his regime. But I lived under castro's, an can talk about it with property. Castro has used USA only as an excuse for treating as a prisoner every Cuban in Cuba. Cuba is a huge prison. Those old Cubans from Miami, even though I might not see eye to eye on their opinions, they deserve my respect, they were incarcerated, tortured and have family who were killed by castro's regime, lot of them even fought against Batista, like Uber Matos. They want a free Cuba as much as I do, and as much as most Cuban do. When Cuban people is not terrorized any more by castro's government, when Cuba holds free elections, you will see that in Cuba just a few want the castros. You could not give arguments, you just tried to associate me with a dictator, who I detest, I detest all dictators, from left and right, especially Cuba's current dictators, castro. Now, what I can see is that you might be one of those "amigos del sanguinario castro", one of those tourists who are blackmailed, most times because of their bed behavior. only you and your blackmailers know.

    December 30, 2014 at 4:18 pm | Reply
  3. moalta

    The word is naive. You sir are naive. Raul Castro, as evidenced through my 23 trips to Cuba, is actually pushing for change faster than the bureaucrats can easily achieve. This does not mean losing the social advantages of Cuba's health care, education and virtually free legal services system. It does not mean losing their free digital High Definition television service – while Americans and Canadians pay over $50 a month for such service. Nor does not mean turning the purpose of society to simply consume and become pawns in corporate capitalism. It does mean that, with a reduced commercial and terrorism fear from the US, that Cuba can advance with the assistance of American commerce and with security of their proven independence.

    December 28, 2014 at 5:42 pm | Reply
    • G Hornet

      Don't blame the bureaucrats, in cuba those bureaucrats will do whatever castro says, what is happening is what castro wants at the speed castro wants. I have never paid for digital HD television. I get over 50 digital chanels at home through antena, here in the USA. Remember nothing is free, that healt, education and legal system ... somebody has to pay for it. castro do not create that wealth, is the cuban people who have to pay for those things, and at a very high price, in money and with total lack of freedom. I am sure you are free in cuba, comunists who are good goverment puppets feel very well in cuba. 23 trips to cuba? really....

      December 30, 2014 at 3:04 pm | Reply
  4. I. Rivera

    "And if they keep their word, I think that could have a transformational effect," he said. "I think the more information that flows freely, the more Cubans will start debating and challenging the system. And I think that would have a very healthy impact."

    Don't be naif!

    December 28, 2014 at 3:07 am | Reply
    • moalta

      If only you could read VOICES FROM THE OTHER SIDE by Keith Bolender (Canadian living in Britain). This book documents the terrorism waged against Cuba from inside the US. Given restricted freedom of thought in the US, you are not likely to find the book in US libraries. It is against this type of terrorism that the CUBAN 5 fought and paid the price with 15 years in Yankee prisons! Viva Cuba! God help the United States of America!

      December 28, 2014 at 5:47 pm | Reply
      • G Hornet

        Moalta, I guess you live in Cuba. I do not know if the 5 chivatones were really fighting terrorism, they were fighting Cuban's freedom (is not typo, they were not fighting for freedom but against it). Traveling 23 times somewhere does not make you expert in that matter. Go a live there, and for 1 minute dare to disagree to official opinion. I lived there for too many years, and visited so many times. The only blockade, embargo and terrorism in Cuba is from the castros against the people of cuba. Viva Cuba Libre...

        December 30, 2014 at 2:58 pm |
      • moalta

        Buena suerte amigo. Temo eres un amigo de Batista como los cubanos viejos en Miami. Por favor, despertas de la realidad del Cuba nuevo ... especialemente si el EEUU es sincero hacer los cambios en su terrorismo contra Cuba.

        December 30, 2014 at 3:47 pm |
      • G Hornet

        Wake up moalta! Wake up! Most Cubans, in and out of Cuba were born after castro stole power in Cuba. A huge percentage were born after Batista's death. I was born after Batista's death, and I am not young any more, I cannot be Batista's friend, I never met him nor lived under his regime. But I lived under castro's, an can talk about it with property. Castro has used USA only as an excuse for treating as a prisoner every Cuban in Cuba. Cuba is a huge prison. Those old Cubans from Miami, even though I might not see eye to eye on their opinions, they deserve my respect, they were incarcerated, tortured and have family who were killed by castro's regime, lot of them even fought against Batista, like Uber Matos. They want a free Cuba as much as I do, and as much as most Cuban do. When Cuban people is not terrorized any more by castro's government, when Cuba holds free elections, you will see that in Cuba just a few want the castros. You could not give arguments, you just tried to associate me with a dictator, who I detest, I detest all dictators, from left and right, especially Cuba's current dictators, castro. Now, what I can see is that you might be one of those "amigos del sanguinario castro", one of those tourists who are blackmailed, most times because of their bed behavior. only you and your blackmailers know.

        December 30, 2014 at 4:19 pm |

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