Sunday, October 19

Is the media scaring us to death over Ebola? Former CNN president Jon Klein on Nielsen's TV ratings glitch; James Risen on how the crackdown on whistleblowers affects reporting.

Is the media scaring us to death over Ebola? Former CNN president Jon Klein on Nielsen's TV ratings glitch; James Risen on how the crackdown on whistleblowers affects reporting.

February 23rd, 2014
12:30 PM ET

The Donald’s fifteen minutes may be up

McKay Coppins and Maggie Haberman discuss Coppins’s profile of Donald Trump and why the media continues to give his political flirtations attention.


Filed under: Blog • BuzzFeed • Donald Trump • Politico • Reliable Sources
What we're reading this week...
October 31st, 2013
04:54 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

NPR's David Folkenflik returns to Reliable Sources this week as our guest host. Folkenflik and Team Reliable have some great topics planned for the show, but in the meantime here are some other stories that caught our eye this week:

'San Francisco Chronicle Bans "Redskins" From Print'

Jumping on the bandwagon with Slate and the Kansas City Star, the Bay Area newspaper has decided to strike the term "Redskins" from its vocabulary. According to a statement by Managing Editor Audrey Cooper, "Not everyone has to be personally offended by a word to make it a slur." Even President Obama has weighed in on the debate, saying "I don’t know whether our attachment to a particular name should override the real legitimate concerns that people have about these things."

'White House Photographer in Front Row at World Series'

Pete Souza literally has a front row seat to history - as the Chief Official White House photographer for Barack Obama, he's witnessed the President rise from United States Senator to Democratic Nominee and ultimately to the President of the United States. On Wednesday, though, he had a different kind of first row seat: watching the Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Cardinals in game six of the World Series.

'35 New Uses for Old Newspapers and Magazines'

Critics have long since promised the death of print journalism, and while we pray that isn't true, at least Buzzfeed found a creative way to soften the blow. With the aid of a glue gun and some scissors, you can now use your old newspapers and magazines to make dresses, wedding bouquets and even hair bows. Who knew?

'A Real Time Map of Births and Deaths'

Worried about missing your mother's birthday or that morning meeting with your boss? This map might just put things in perspective for you. Created by Brad Lyon (who holds a doctoral degree in mathematics), the interactive map shows the viewer births and deaths around the world in actual time. Creepy as it sounds, the map actually has some uses - namely, to understand how the world's population is growing toward nine million by 2042.

What we're reading this week...
August 29th, 2013
06:12 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Elizabeth Cherneff, CNN

We’ve got a busy show planned this Sunday when Brian Stelter of the New York Times returns to guest host ‘Reliable Sources.’ We’ll discuss the latest coverage out of Syria amid rising tensions in the region, but until then, here are some other stories that caught our attention this week:

‘Why bloggers fell for a fake TechCrunch story about self-driving cars’ Slate’s Will Oremus took note of a recent TechCrunch story titled ‘Dispatch from the Future: Uber to Purchase 2,500 Driverless Cars From Google.’ Only problem? The post, complete with a July 25, 2023 dateline, was fictional. That didn’t stop some journalists, who tweeted, blogged and incorporated the post into their stories as though it were factual. While Google announced its plans to invest $258 million in the car-service mobile app earlier this month, it appears that, for now, entire fleets of driverless cars are still a phenomenon of the future.

‘Murdoch to purchase Los Angeles winery’

He’s one of the most well-known media moguls in the world, and Rupert Murdoch is now adding wineries to his list of acquisitions. Politico reports this week that Murdoch is in the process of closing a $28.2 million deal to buy a combo estate/vineyard in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. Spanning 13 acres and 7,500 square feet, the property was originally owned and built by Victor Fleming, director of Hollywood classics like ‘The Wizard of Oz’ and ‘Gone With the Wind.’

‘Will this be the tweet heard ‘round the world?’ The Washington Post’s Dominic Basulto speculates what Twitter can learn from Facebook’s 2012 IPO amid rumors that the social media giant could also go public in 2014. He notes that if/when and IPO should arise, Twitter would join other publicly traded media companies like Google, Instagram, and Linked In. Basulto writes that as social media companies expand, so does Wall Street’s influence and a subsequent focus on mobile platforms to generate revenue.

‘Elmore Leonard talks writing in never-before-seen videos’

Famed crime/suspense novelist Elmore Leonard passed away August 20, but his writing expertise is the focus of several never-before seen videos. In two videos, Buzzfeed highlights Leonard’s 10 rules for writers. His tips range from lighthearted to serious, including ‘try not to show off with your writing,’ and ‘try to leave out the parts that writers skip.’ Over his lifetime, 26 of Leonard’s books were adapted into screenplays.

‘No, ‘twerk’ and ‘selfie’ have not been added to the Oxford English Dictionary’ ‘Twerk’ was the word of the week after Miley  Cyrus’ over-the-top VMA’s performance, but the word caught people’s attention for another reason, too. Critics were quick to point out that ‘twerk’, among other words, was not added to the Oxford English Dictionary, but added to the separate entity, Oxford Dictionaries Online. Multiple media pundits were quick to pick up on the error, but not before several outlets misreported the additions. Among other notable words added to Oxford Dictionaries Online were ‘selfie,’ ‘emoji’, and ‘food baby.’

Tune in Sunday at 11a EDT

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Filed under: Blog • BuzzFeed • Media • Reliable Sources • Rupert Murdoch • Twitter • What we're reading
What we're reading this week
July 25th, 2013
05:41 PM ET

What we're reading this week

By Sara Fischer, CNN

The New York Times debuts its first “Times Documentary”

In April 2012, the New York Times published a five-part series of articles written by New York Times published reporter John Branch, illustrating the reality of the cultural pressures surrounding a girls' basketball team, Carroll Academy, a juvenile court-run school in Huntingdon, Tennessee. The sports editor of the New York Times received an overwhelming amount of public support for them team following the series being published. In response to the reaction, Branch revisited the team, the “Lady Jaguars,” to write two more articles, highlighting the community struggling with “high unemployment, teen pregnancy and rampant methamphetamine and prescription drug abuse.” The New York Times decided to turn Branch’s stories into a 17-minute documentary, the first “Times documentary”-branded video that the traditionally print-based publication has ever produced. The Huffington Post discusses the role of documentaries in telling a traditional print-story and how it changes the consumption of the story for its’ viewers.

Buzzfeed discovers the "Smartest Ever Ad Campaign to use National Flags"

Grande Reportagem, a Portuguese news magazine, hired a Lisbon-based ad agency called DraftFCB to create a simple yet effective print ad campaign that is geared to represent humanitarian struggles worldwide through the imagery of various country’s flags. For example, an image of the United States represents American’s knowledge (or lack there of) of the Iraq War. The blue space represents the number of Americans who do not know what the Iraq War is, in comparison the red space which represents those in favor of the War, and the white space, those opposed. While the statistical representations are not completely accurate, due to the rough-to-scale proportions of the flags images, they do a great job of informing the viewer of the general disparities in human conditions worldwide.

New York officials are investigating Bloomberg reporters' access to to consumers information

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's office is investigating how much access Bloomberg LP news reporters may have had to the company’s customers. “The probe follows inquiries made in May by the U.S. Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury into Bloomberg customer data access,” The Wall Street Journal reports. The article also discusses the issue of reporters' knowledge about client activities in a wider context describing how the issue first came about in 2012 when “officials complained to Bloomberg about reporters' access to bankers and traders' whereabouts and log in data, which the firm felt was a violation of its employees' privacy."