Sunday, November 16

Barbara Bowman claims the media protected Bill Cosby from her rape allegations; China's president finally faces a free press; the TV station behind #pointergate refuses to apologize.

Barbara Bowman claims the media protected Bill Cosby from her rape allegations; China's president finally faces a free press; the TV station behind #pointergate refuses to apologize.

June 15th, 2014
12:59 PM ET

Iraq: How to distinguish between real news and propaganda

Above, Storyful’s David Clinch on how his organization works to verify - and sometimes debunk - amateur photos and videos emerging from Iraq.

Here's the transcript:

STELTER: You have surely heard the old maxim that "in the fog of war, the first casualty is the truth." You've heard it because it tends to be true. It's very hard to know what's really happening in Iraq right now. Of course, it's a country that will always be associated in our minds with bad intelligence.

Sometimes reporters and TV producers have to rely on primary sources - photos and videos from people on the ever-shifting front lines. So, the vetting process for this material is critical. Many people here at CNN do it every day. We have Arabic speakers who watch video, translate them, cross-reference them, and sometimes debunk them. In fact, a message went out to the whole newsroom here on Friday, reminding everybody to steer clear of misinformation and mislabeled photos.

For help with this, lots of other news organizations depend on a fascinating start up called Storyful. It calls itself a social media news agency. Here's a sign how important this work is becoming: last year, Rupert Murdoch acquired Storyful for $25 million.

They have been busy there, debunking insurgent propaganda from Iraq, and I want you to hear how. So let me bring in David Clinch, executive editor of Storyful. He was previously a senior CNN international auditor here at CNN. David, thanks for joining me.

DAVID CLINCH, STORYFUL: Nice to be here, Brian. Thank you.

STELTER: Let me put two photos on screen that are from Twitter this week. Both of these are Blackhawk helicopters and the caption you can see on screen, it says, "Al Qaeda militants capture U.S. Blackhawk helicopters in Iraq." Are these images real? FULL POST

FULL STORY

Filed under: Iraq • Media • Reliable Sources
February 2nd, 2014
02:01 PM ET

Did Christie know or didn't he?

Kate Zernike talks to Brian Stelter about her reporting  of new developments in the ongoing story of Governor Christie's possible involvement in closing lanes on the George Washington Bridge.


Filed under: Chris Christie • Media • Media Criticism • Politics
February 2nd, 2014
02:01 PM ET

Dylan Farrow tells story of abuse

ABC News' Dan Abrams joins Brian Stelter to talk about Dylan Farrow's open letter about Woody Allen's alleged abuse. They also discussed the media's coverage of the re-convicted Amanda Knox and how some news outlets are portraying her as a vixen, while others present her as a victim of injustice.


Filed under: Amanda Knox • Dylan Farrow • International • Media • Media Criticism • Woody Allen
February 2nd, 2014
02:00 PM ET

MSNBC faces backlash from offensive Tweet

After an MSNBC Tweet suggests conservatives don't like biracial families, Errol Louis and CNN Crossfire host S.E. Cupp join Brian Stelter to examine if the left-leaning network goes overboard with their anti-GOP speech.


Filed under: Media • Media Criticism • MSNBC
Grammy Awards attracted 28.5 million
January 27th, 2014
06:00 PM ET

Grammy Awards attracted 28.5 million

By Brian Stelter, CNN

Maybe it was Beyonce, or maybe it was the Beatles. (Actually, it was probably both.) The Grammy Awards attracted 28.5 million viewers to CBS on Sunday night, which is essentially a modern-day record for the annual music awards show.

CBS described it in a press release as "the second largest audience for the awards broadcast since 1993." Awards shows in general have been on a ratings upswing in recent years. One oft-cited reason is that, since they're big live events, they stand out in an increasingly on-demand television world.

Sunday's telecast would have been the biggest since 1993, period, were it not for the tragic circumstances of the 2012 Grammys. That year, Whitney Houston died less than 24 hours before the awards telecast, causing a dramatic surge in viewership the next day. (The average viewership was about 40 million.)

The Grammys are typically the second most popular awards show of the year behind the Academy Awards. This year's average viewership was just a smidge higher than last year's average of 28.4 million. (CBS pointed out that a more apples-to-apples comparison was between this year and 2010, the last time the Grammys were scheduled in January instead of February to avoid the Winter Olympics. In 2010, 25.9 million viewers tuned in.)

Read more of Brian's article here.

Posted by
Filed under: Blog • CBS • Grammys • Media • Reliable Sources
January 19th, 2014
01:17 PM ET

Weather Channel, DirecTV in stormy relationship

The Weather Channel's Jim Cantore and Barry Parr on the dispute between The Weather Channel and DirecTV that has led to the channel being blacked out in 20 million homes.


Filed under: DirecTV • Media • The Weather Channel
December 22nd, 2013
01:11 PM ET

Funny Media Moment of the Week

Host Brian Stelter shares one of the funny media moments you might have missed this week.


Filed under: Comedy • Conan O'Brien • Media
Western journalists' China visa dramas: Don't shoot the messenger
December 22nd, 2013
09:45 AM ET

Western journalists' China visa dramas: Don't shoot the messenger

 By Jaime A. FlorCruz, CNN

Editor's note: Jaime's China is a column about Chinese society and politics. Jaime FlorCruz has lived and worked in China since 1971. Now CNN's Beijing bureau chief, he studied Chinese history at Peking University (1977-81) and was TIME Magazine's Beijing correspondent (1982-2000).

Beijing (CNN) - Every December, foreign correspondents in China go through the rigmarole of renewing press cards and visas, which typically run out at the end of the year.

This time around, Chinese authorities held up renewing the credentials of roughly two dozen Bloomberg and New York Times reporters after the two American news outfits published muckraking stories about the wealth of the families of top Chinese leaders.

READ: China blocks website after report on Wen Jiabao's wealth

Without renewed press cards, they could not renew their Chinese visas. Without the visas, reporters and their families would be forced to leave China.

"5 Days Till Visa Expiry," New York Times reporter Andrew Jacobs, tweeted on Tuesday.

"Do you think hauling all my stuff to gates of the Foreign Ministry holding a tag sale will get their attention?"

Read more of the article here.


Filed under: Censorship • China • Media • Media Criticism
December 15th, 2013
12:32 PM ET

Media identify missing man as CIA spy

The AP's Matt Apuzzo, who broke the news that Robert Levinson was captured in Iran while on an unauthorized CIA mission, discusses his reporting. AP Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll also weighs in on the decision to run the story.


Filed under: CIA • Media • Media Criticism • Robert Levinson
December 15th, 2013
12:31 PM ET

White House press angry over access

Amy Holmes, Christina Bellatoni, Peter Hamby and Brian Stelter on the feud between the White House and the White House press corps, who want more access to President Obama.

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