Sunday, September 28

The role of journalist during wartime; Did NFL ties lead ESPN to suspend analyst? Jorge Ramos' opinion on immigration in the media; ABC's handling of Miss America controversy.

The role of journalist during wartime; Did NFL ties lead ESPN to suspend analyst? Jorge Ramos' opinion on immigration in the media; ABC's handling of Miss America controversy.

What we're reading this week...
December 6th, 2013
12:54 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

'This woman took a selfie in front of a man attempting suicide'

From TMI mirror selfies to basically any Kim Kardashian selfie, cell phone cameras and social media have officially blurred the rules of what's appropriate to share... and what's not. But for one woman in New York, it might have been a case of simply taking a selfie at the wrong time. The New York Post published a picture of the young, blonde woman on the cover of its Monday edition, taking a selfie with a man attempting to commit suicide in the background. Perhaps, however, she didn't notice the suicidal man and was only taking a picture of the Brooklyn Bridge in the background. What do you think?

'The trouble at Bloomberg'

Bloomberg LP, known for its business-savvy reporting, has tripled its revenues in the 12 years since Michael Bloomberg traded his plushy corporate corner office for the city of New York's mayoral podium, according to Fortune. But while "Bloomberg is on track for record revenues of $8.3 billion in 2013 and profits of about $2.7 billion," the company is battling PR nightmares, including its most recent scandal of censoring its own journalists in China. Check out CNN Money's preview of the story after the jump.

'Can Politico take Manhattan?'

The publication known for inside-the-beltway news is breaking ground in a new city outside of the nation's capital. Politico's parent company recently purchased Capital New York, a small New York-based website, and Politico founder and CEO Jim VandeHei is gearing up for the company's expansion. "When you look at City Hall, when you look at Albany, when you look at media, even when you look at finance, I think there are huge pockets of this city that are under-covered or that could be covered exponentially better," VandeHei told Bloomberg News.

For more on Politico's new venture, tune in later this month for Brian Stelter's interview with VandeHei, and watch for Stelter's debut show this Sunday at 11am ET.

What we're reading this week...
September 5th, 2013
05:04 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

We’re gearing up for a busy show this Sunday when Frank Sesno, director of the George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs, rejoins ‘Reliable Sources’ as our guest host. As U.S. congressional leaders debate military action in Syria, we’ll discuss how the developments are playing out in media outlets at home and abroad- in the meantime, here are some other stories that caught our eye this week.

‘Jeff Daniels: ‘The Newsroom’ returning for Season 3’  There’s more to come from Will McAvoy and the world of Atlantis Cable News. On Tuesday, Jeff Daniels confirmed the hit HBO series had been renewed, tweeting ‘It’s official. #Newsroom coming back for a Season 3.’ The series has held onto steady ratings since its premiere last year. Both Jeff Daniels and co-star Jane Fonda received Primetime Emmy nominations for their performances as a fictional cable news anchor and CEO, respectively.

CBS honors 50th anniversary of 30-minute ‘Evening News’ by going black and white’  Viewers tuning in to the Labor Day broadcast of the CBS Evening News got a special treat on Monday. In honor of the network’s 50th anniversary of its transition to the 30-minute broadcast, anchor Scott Pelley ended Monday’s newscast with a black and white tribute video featuring footage with legendary CBS anchor Walter Cronkite. Additionally, older newsreel footage incorporated into the segment helped illustrated the broadcast’s evolution.

‘The New York Post gets a new digital look and new ad units’  This week, ‘The New York Post’ got a digital makeover, complete with a simplified, cleaner overall look. Ad Age’s Alex Kantrowitz notes that the Post now incorporates more prominent photo placement on its site. The redesign was led by the paper’s managing editor, Remy Stern, as well as the same agency (Hard Candy Shell) which helped The New Republic and Newsweek with their web redesigns. The move is an approach many news organizations are undertaking in an effort to remain competitive on expanding digital platforms.

‘The Onion denies taking a serious line on Syria’  Buzzfeed’s Rosie Gray takes a look at The Onion’s recent articles on Bashar al-Assad and Syria. While the satirical news site has always garnered attention for its take on the news, the Onion has taken a demonstrably more provocative approach with its recent Syria coverage. With headlines like “Help has to be on the way now, thinks Syrian man currently being gassed,” and ‘Nation currently more sympathetic to demise of Planet Krypton than plight of Syria,’ the Onion has remained critical of U.S.  inaction in Syria. However, Will Tracy, The Onion’s editor-in-chief, says the paper isn’t straying from its satirical point of view, saying “I wouldn’t say we’ve staked out an editorial line so much as we’ve chosen to acknowledge two equally valid points of view at once.”

What stories are you reading this week? Sound off in the comments below, and be sure to tune in for 'Reliable Sources' Sunday at 11am EDT.

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Filed under: CBS • HBO • Jeff Daniels • New York Post • Reliable Sources • Syria • The Newsroom • The Onion • What we're reading
July 28th, 2013
01:40 PM ET

Anthony Weiner media circus

Errol Louis and Lois Romano speak with guest host Frank Sesno on the week's coverage of Anthony Weiner's latest sex scandal.

July 12th, 2013
07:18 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

After more than a year of non-stop media coverage, protests and court hearings, the George Zimmerman trial is set to wrap up in the next few days. All three 24-hour news networks have spent the past few weeks producing wall-to-wall coverage of the murder trial - but how fair has the coverage been to the prosecution and to the defendant? Callie Crossley, host of WGBH's  "Boston Public Radio" will join our guest host, NPR's David Folkenflik, to discuss.

Next, The Guardian's Ana Marie Cox, The Washington Post's Carlos Lozada and The Atlantic's Molly Ball  swing by the studio to weigh in on Mark Leibovich's new book, "This Town," which focuses on inside-the-beltway relationships between politicos, the press and the parties they attend together. Luckily for us, Lozada says there are 10 rules for succeeding in "This Town" (aka Washington D.C.). Can you guess what they are?

Jumping a topic train from DC politics to New York election races, our group adds former New York Post reporter Leela de Kretzer to  discuss tabloid coverage of Eliot Spitzer's and Anthony Weiner's upcoming bids for NYC comptroller and mayor, respectively. But as Ball wrote earlier this week in the Atlantic, "If Spitzer and Weiner manage to join Sanford in getting elected post-sex scandal, they won't be signaling a bold new trend. They'll be doing what politicians have always done: getting in trouble and then getting elected anyway."

Rupert Murdoch has agreed to testify before the British Parliament following the leak of a secretly taped recording where he has an ethically questionable conversation with News Corp journalists. Former Member of Parliament Louise Mensch, who questioned Murdoch during his original testimony to Parliament, joins Folkenflik to share her insight into the secret tape and what it's like to now work for one of Murdoch's newspapers, The Sun.

Next, former Al Jazeera English anchor David Marash and NPR's Cairo bureau chief Leila Fadel weigh in on Al Jazeera's struggle with editorial independence and coping with the Egyptian military following recent Egyptian protests in Cairo.

Rounding out the show, president and general manager of WDRB Louisville Bill Lamb tells Folkenflik why his station is moving away from the "breaking news" hype.

Tune in Sunday at 11am ET.

June 9th, 2013
12:49 PM ET

Media Monitor – June 9

The "Bag Men" sue The New York Post, the Koch brothers consider buying a newspaper, Keith Olbermann lands a new gig and two television news personalities lose their cool on air.

What we're reading this week...
May 30th, 2013
05:19 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

The official start of summer is still a few weeks away, but the weather is too beautiful to stay inside. So grab your sunscreen and relax by the pool while you catch up on what the Reliable staff is reading this week!

Do the shoes make the woman? Some journalists seem to think so, as they've written articles referencing a woman's shoes... as if her footwear choice lends any insight into her individual integrity. Unfortunately, the "insight" is usually cast in a negative tone, such as when USA Today’s Joanne Bamberger wrote that Sheryl Sandberg wants “women to pull themselves up by the Louboutin straps." According to one Slate.com writer, though, "the mention of high heels is an egregious detail—so many women wear them, they’re about as meaningful a fashion choice as a senator in a suit."

Closing up shop: With U.S. soldiers back home and a dwindling stream of news from the Middle Eastern nation, news organizations have been shutting down their brick-and-mortar operations. This week, CNN was the last American news organization to do so, though it will continue to have a permanent presence. According to TVNewser, "it's also the end of an era," as CNN has operated a bureau in Iraq since 1990, becoming a household name for its coverage of the Gulf War.

News from the mole hole: It's been more than a year since news broke of a liberal mole in the Fox New lair, but the man at the center of the story continues to cash in on his 15-minutes of fame. In an article released on Salon.com and tied to his new book, Joe Muto writes about where Fox News' editorial direction comes from and gives readers a rundown into O'Reilly's daily schedule. So what's next on Muto's plate? Only time will tell.

Tawdry tabloid tours: New York City's landmarks have certainly staked their places in history – from visiting The Great Gatsby’s Plaza Hotel, to the Upper-East Side tours of Carrie Bradshaw's rent-controlled brownstone, people from all over the world travel to see the places of their favorite novels, TV shows and movies. "In February The New York Post, in partnership with Metro Sightseeing, an offshoot of Circle Line Sightseeing, began taking riders on a tabloid excursion around the city, revisiting many of the sites immortalized in the newspaper’s renowned headlines," writes The New York Times. Apparently, though, one scandalized sightseeing ride isn't enough - TMZ has now joined the scene.

So where would you go on a Tabloid Tour? And are you reading anything interesting this week? Tell us in the comments below.

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Filed under: Baghdad • Blog • Iraq • Media • New York Post • Reliable Sources • TMZ • What we're reading
December 9th, 2012
12:56 PM ET

Death On The Front Page

Erik Wemple, Callie Crossley and Howard Kurtz examine the New York Post’s controversial front cover; was it ethical journalism?


Filed under: New York Post • Tabloids
December 6th, 2012
10:12 AM ET

From the desk of Howard Kurtz: The subway picture worth a thousand words

By Howard Kurtz, CNN

Editor's note: Howard Kurtz is the host of CNN's "Reliable Sources" and is Newsweek's Washington bureau chief. He is also a contributor to the website Daily Download.

(CNN) - It was a horrifying front-page photo in every sense of the word.

It felt cheap, degrading and exploitative in a way that words could never match.

The photo captures a Queens man, Ki-Suck Han, after he had been pushed onto the subway tracks Monday as an oncoming train roared toward him. The screaming headline says it all: "DOOMED."

But the New York Post had every right to run the picture.

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