Sunday, July 27

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

Rula Jebreal and Jeffrey Goldberg discuss coverage of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict; Maziar Bahari on the recent arrests of journalists in Iran and his time spent in an Iranian prison

January 26th, 2014
12:28 PM ET

“See It” for yourself

Comcast’s Sam Schwartz tells Brian Stelter about new “SEEiT” technology that allows for increased connection between Tweets and television.


Filed under: Blog • Comcast • Reliable Sources • Twitter
December 29th, 2013
12:48 PM ET

Media year in review: Culture

Rosie Gray, Christina Warren, Hunter Walker, David Folkenflik and Brian Stelter look back at how the media influenced culture in 2013.


Filed under: Chris Hadfield • Oreo • Social Media • Twitter
December 22nd, 2013
01:14 PM ET

Trial by social media

Michael Calderone, Ryan Lizza, Alicia Shepard and Brian Stelter weigh in on the social media mob reaction to one (former) PR executive’s offensive Tweet.


Filed under: Justine Sacco • Twitter
December 14th, 2013
01:58 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show...

Tune in to "Reliable Sources" this Sunday at 11 a.m. Eastern! Here's a preview from the program's host Brian Stelter:

In 2010 the Associated Press reporters Matt Apuzzo and Adam Goldman learned that the United States government had been lying about Robert Levinson, an American who had disappeared in Iran three years earlier. Levinson was not, as government officials claimed, a private investigator who had been in Iran on business. He was a contractor for the C.I.A. The Associated Press and several other news organizations refrained from reporting what they knew about Levinson's identity until this week. Why now?

That's where we will begin "Reliable Sources" this Sunday. The White House says that the publication of stories about Levinson has been "highly irresponsible." The A.P. obviously disagrees. Apuzzo will be on set with me in Washington to discuss.

Before the show, I'd like to know what you think about the C.I.A. spy stories - add a comment at the bottom of this blog post.

Then we'll pivot to this week's Santa controversy. (What an odd thing to write.) Aisha Harris, a culture blogger for Slate magazine, wrote a blog post on Tuesday titled "Santa Claus Should Not Be a White Man Anymore." By now you've probably heard about the Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly's reaction — "Santa just is white" — and the reactions to her reaction, etcetera.

But someone was missing from Kelly's much-talked-about segment on Wednesday: the blogger who started it all. Harris says "Fox didn't bother reaching out to me personally to debate the issue at hand." Maybe Fox reached out to someone else at Slate; I don't know. But when a CNN producer emailed Harris on Friday morning, she replied right away; she'll join me live from New York. (For what it's worth, Fox also apparently tried to book her on Friday; Kelly said on Friday night that Slate "denied our request.")

Later on in the show, we'll look at the recently reignited debate between the White House and the press corps over access with CNN’s national political reporter Peter Hamby, Roll Call's new editor-in-chief Christina Bellantoni and The Blaze's "Hot List" host Amy Holmes. The political panel will also discuss Hamby's exclusive report on Republican plans to overhaul the 2016 primary process.

Here's a segment we have been planning for weeks: the "Anchorman 2" marketing assault. Some analysts have said that Ron Burgundy is showing us the future of movie marketing. I'll ask Adweek's Sam Thielman if he agrees.

[Post-show update: I'd mentioned a segment here about Comcast and a new technology that lets Twitter users tune their TV sets and start watching shows on their mobile devices straight from Twitter. We held the segment for time constraints, so look for it on a future edition of the program.]

See you Sunday!

–Brian

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Filed under: Anchorman • Barack Obama • CIA • Comcast • GOP • Politics • Reliable Sources • Robert Levinson • Santa Claus • Sneak Peek • Twitter
October 6th, 2013
01:21 PM ET

The future of news and journalism

GWU's School of Media and Public Affairs Director Frank Sesno sits down with his class to get their take on coverage of the government shutdown and what they think the media could be covering better.


Filed under: Blog • journalism • Reliable Sources • Twitter
September 8th, 2013
01:11 PM ET

Twitter on the campaign trail

CNN Digital’s National Political Reporter Peter Hamby joins Kevin Madden, Christina Bellantoni and guest host Frank Sesno to share his recent findings from a study focused on social media and the 2012 presidential campaign season.


Filed under: 2012 Campaign • Barack Obama • Media Criticism • Mitt Romney • Politics • Social Media • Twitter
September 6th, 2013
04:36 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Sara Fischer, CNN

We've got a packed show this week on Reliable Sources with guest host Frank Sesno, Director of The George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs. As a former CNN Washington bureau chief, Sesno will bring a unique perspective to this week’s media headlines.

We’ll kick off the show with CNN's Senior International Correspondent Arwa Damon, who will provide an update on the crisis in Syria, reporting live from Beirut. Conversation about the conflict will then continue with Tara Sonenshine, former Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs and Shibley Telhami, Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland, College Park.

CNN’s own digital political reporter, Peter Hamby, released a case study describing Twitter’s impact on the coverage of the 2012 presidential campaign. Hamby will speak with us live to discuss his research and experience and will be joined on a panel by Christina Bellantoni, politics editor for The PBS NewsHour and former senior Romney campaign advisor and CNN political commentator Kevin Madden

Then, we’ll sit down with former executive editor of The Washington Post, Len Downie, to get his take on Jeffrey Bezos’ purchase of Washington Post, a new study with the Committee to Protect Journalists on leaks from the Obama administration and stories this week about Edward Snowden

Finally, we’ll hear from POLITICO’s Susan Glasser about the impact and survival of long-form journalism.

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.

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Filed under: Blog • Politics • Reliable Sources • Sneak Peek • Syria • Twitter • Washington Post
What we're reading this week...
August 29th, 2013
06:12 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Elizabeth Cherneff, CNN

We’ve got a busy show planned this Sunday when Brian Stelter of the New York Times returns to guest host ‘Reliable Sources.’ We’ll discuss the latest coverage out of Syria amid rising tensions in the region, but until then, here are some other stories that caught our attention this week:

‘Why bloggers fell for a fake TechCrunch story about self-driving cars’ Slate’s Will Oremus took note of a recent TechCrunch story titled ‘Dispatch from the Future: Uber to Purchase 2,500 Driverless Cars From Google.’ Only problem? The post, complete with a July 25, 2023 dateline, was fictional. That didn’t stop some journalists, who tweeted, blogged and incorporated the post into their stories as though it were factual. While Google announced its plans to invest $258 million in the car-service mobile app earlier this month, it appears that, for now, entire fleets of driverless cars are still a phenomenon of the future.

‘Murdoch to purchase Los Angeles winery’

He’s one of the most well-known media moguls in the world, and Rupert Murdoch is now adding wineries to his list of acquisitions. Politico reports this week that Murdoch is in the process of closing a $28.2 million deal to buy a combo estate/vineyard in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles. Spanning 13 acres and 7,500 square feet, the property was originally owned and built by Victor Fleming, director of Hollywood classics like ‘The Wizard of Oz’ and ‘Gone With the Wind.’

‘Will this be the tweet heard ‘round the world?’ The Washington Post’s Dominic Basulto speculates what Twitter can learn from Facebook’s 2012 IPO amid rumors that the social media giant could also go public in 2014. He notes that if/when and IPO should arise, Twitter would join other publicly traded media companies like Google, Instagram, and Linked In. Basulto writes that as social media companies expand, so does Wall Street’s influence and a subsequent focus on mobile platforms to generate revenue.

‘Elmore Leonard talks writing in never-before-seen videos’

Famed crime/suspense novelist Elmore Leonard passed away August 20, but his writing expertise is the focus of several never-before seen videos. In two videos, Buzzfeed highlights Leonard’s 10 rules for writers. His tips range from lighthearted to serious, including ‘try not to show off with your writing,’ and ‘try to leave out the parts that writers skip.’ Over his lifetime, 26 of Leonard’s books were adapted into screenplays.

‘No, ‘twerk’ and ‘selfie’ have not been added to the Oxford English Dictionary’ ‘Twerk’ was the word of the week after Miley  Cyrus’ over-the-top VMA’s performance, but the word caught people’s attention for another reason, too. Critics were quick to point out that ‘twerk’, among other words, was not added to the Oxford English Dictionary, but added to the separate entity, Oxford Dictionaries Online. Multiple media pundits were quick to pick up on the error, but not before several outlets misreported the additions. Among other notable words added to Oxford Dictionaries Online were ‘selfie,’ ‘emoji’, and ‘food baby.’

Tune in Sunday at 11a EDT

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Filed under: Blog • BuzzFeed • Media • Reliable Sources • Rupert Murdoch • Twitter • What we're reading
What we're reading this week...
August 8th, 2013
05:54 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Sara Fischer, CNN

We’ve got a busy show planned for Sunday with our ‘Reliable Sources’ guest host, Brian Stelter, television and digital media reporter for the new York Times and author of New York Times best seller, Top of the Morning. We’ll discuss the coverage and reaction following the new developments in the purchase by Jeffrey Bezos, CEO of Amazon, of the iconic Washington Post enterprise as well as the recent controversy stirring between the Republican Party and NBC and CNN over new Hillary Clinton entertainment programming, but until then; here are some other stories that caught our eye this week.

Richard Cohen's Huma Abedin Column Is Quite Something

The Huffington Post puts the spotlight on the bizarre way in which Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen’s writes about Huma Abedin's decision to defend her husband. The Post describes Cohen’s unconventional strategy to relate his personal life to that of Huma Abedin’s as awkward and uncomfortable. The Huffington Post article also notes that this is not the first piece of Cohen’s to spark controversy, recalling a piece he wrote in July about Trayvon Martin, which was condemned by many journalists as being slightly racist.

For Twitter, Free Speech Is a High-Wire Act

The Wall Street Journal’s Shira Ovide argues that Twitter’s continued success makes it difficult for the corporation to uphold the rights of free speech. Citing examples of anti-Semitic dialogue being propagated via Twitter, Odive argues that many of the billions of tweets sent worldwide clash with free speech standards globally, creating a growing dilemma for Twitter executives.

Will Amazon and Washington Post Work Together? Who Knows?!

Jeffrey Bezos’ recent purchase of the Washington Post for $250 million dollars, begs the obvious revenue question: Will Bezos’ online retail empire, Amazon, join forces with his recent media purchase? AdWeek’s David Taintor reached out to a few analysts to learn more about the recent purchase and what it means for the digital future of the Washington Post. While some analysts argue that it is too early to say if Amazon’s digital strategy will be integrated into The Washington Post’s, others argue that in the future Bezos will likely ask the Post team to focus on and experiment with the digital side of the business.

April 14th, 2013
01:09 PM ET

Congressman’s Twitter Trap

Rep. Steve Cohen tells Howard Kurtz why he posted then deleted a flirtatious Tweet to singer Cyndi Lauper.


Filed under: Blog • Reliable Sources • Twitter
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