Sunday, September 21

Did Roger Goodell save his job? Anthony Weiner on why the public doesn't trust the media; the ethical challenges for journalists in reporting on ISIS propaganda videos

Did Roger Goodell save his job? Anthony Weiner on why the public doesn't trust the media; the ethical challenges for journalists in reporting on ISIS propaganda videos

September 15th, 2013
01:13 PM ET

Patrick's picks

Guest host Patrick Gavin offers his take on several stories in the news which earned his thumbs up or thumbs down.

What we're reading this week...
August 8th, 2013
05:54 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Sara Fischer, CNN

We’ve got a busy show planned for Sunday with our ‘Reliable Sources’ guest host, Brian Stelter, television and digital media reporter for the new York Times and author of New York Times best seller, Top of the Morning. We’ll discuss the coverage and reaction following the new developments in the purchase by Jeffrey Bezos, CEO of Amazon, of the iconic Washington Post enterprise as well as the recent controversy stirring between the Republican Party and NBC and CNN over new Hillary Clinton entertainment programming, but until then; here are some other stories that caught our eye this week.

Richard Cohen's Huma Abedin Column Is Quite Something

The Huffington Post puts the spotlight on the bizarre way in which Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen’s writes about Huma Abedin's decision to defend her husband. The Post describes Cohen’s unconventional strategy to relate his personal life to that of Huma Abedin’s as awkward and uncomfortable. The Huffington Post article also notes that this is not the first piece of Cohen’s to spark controversy, recalling a piece he wrote in July about Trayvon Martin, which was condemned by many journalists as being slightly racist.

For Twitter, Free Speech Is a High-Wire Act

The Wall Street Journal’s Shira Ovide argues that Twitter’s continued success makes it difficult for the corporation to uphold the rights of free speech. Citing examples of anti-Semitic dialogue being propagated via Twitter, Odive argues that many of the billions of tweets sent worldwide clash with free speech standards globally, creating a growing dilemma for Twitter executives.

Will Amazon and Washington Post Work Together? Who Knows?!

Jeffrey Bezos’ recent purchase of the Washington Post for $250 million dollars, begs the obvious revenue question: Will Bezos’ online retail empire, Amazon, join forces with his recent media purchase? AdWeek’s David Taintor reached out to a few analysts to learn more about the recent purchase and what it means for the digital future of the Washington Post. While some analysts argue that it is too early to say if Amazon’s digital strategy will be integrated into The Washington Post’s, others argue that in the future Bezos will likely ask the Post team to focus on and experiment with the digital side of the business.

What we’re reading this week
April 18th, 2013
06:27 PM ET

What we’re reading this week

By Laura Koran, CNN

On this week’s show, we will be taking a look at the media’s hits and misses covering the attack on the Boston Marathon. Tune in for that on Sunday, and see what other stories caught our attention this week right here.

The wisdom of Mr. Rogers: In the aftermath of terrible tragedies, such as the Boston Marathon bombings, people tend to seek out examples of human kindness to dispel the notion that the world is a dark and hateful place. It is not surprising then, that a meme featuring the beloved children’s show host Mr. Rogers has gone viral since Monday’s terrorist attack. The image, circulating on social media sites, displays one of Mr. Rogers’ classic, heartfelt musings: “When I was a boy and I would see scary things on the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’” As Reverend J.C. Austin points out, these simple words hold a deeper truth, and serve as a powerful reminder that the “helpers” are more powerful than the “haters.”

Is brevity the soul of good reporting? A chart recently released by Dean Starkman of Columbia Journalism Review shows that the number of long-form stories (in this case, stories with more than 2,500 words) published by The Wall Street Journal has declined significantly over the past decade. The paper responded to the chart saying in part, “The number of words in an article has never been the barometer by which the quality of a publication or its value to readers should be measured.” But many, including Alexis C. Madrigal of The Atlantic, are left wondering whether this new preference for shorter news stories can be attributed to the robust paywall on the paper’s website.

A fly on the wall: New York Times reporter Brian Stelter caught a truly lucky break when he was tipped off about a lunch between “Today” host Matt Lauer, and his former co-host Meredith Viera. That lunchtime chat, which Stelter surreptitiously eavesdropped on from the bar at New York restaurant Park Avenue Spring, provided the closing anecdote for Stelter’s new book, “Top of the Morning: Inside the Cutthroat World of Morning TV,” which releases next week. Stelter recounts how Viera reassured Lauer that the slew of negative media coverage of his involvement in Ann Curry’s removal from the show would soon pass, telling him, “It’ll be O.K.”

Learning from history: A new documentary short premiering at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival takes a look at The New York Times’ dismal coverage of the Holocaust during World War II. The film, “Reporting on the Times,” is the work of 22-year old filmmaker Emily Harrold, who hopes her movie can serve as a warning to news organizations covering (or not covering) human rights crises today. The Times has long been criticized for under-reporting on the Holocaust; criticism that the paper itself has called, “valid.”

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Filed under: Matt Lauer • Media • Media Criticism • Mr. Rogers • NBC • New York Times • Today • Wall Street Journal • What we're reading
December 23rd, 2012
12:49 PM ET

Media Monitor- December 23

Fascinating behind-the-scenes details in a Wall Street Journal article on fiscal cliff negotiations, The Daily Beast's "uh-oh!" moment, Fox News makes light of Hillary Clinton’s concussion and a TV meteorologist is fired for a Facebook post.


Filed under: Blog • Facebook • Fiscal Cliff • Fox News • Media • Media Criticism • Media Monitor • Politics • Reliable Sources • The Daily Beast • Wall Street Journal