Sunday, December 14

Rolling Stone & UVA—Did the reporter have an agenda? How the CIA uses misinformation; should the media publish hacked emails? Obama's recent media blitz; an American journalist held in Iran.

Rolling Stone & UVA—Did the reporter have an agenda? How the CIA uses misinformation; should the media publish hacked emails? Obama's recent media blitz; an American journalist held in Iran.

July 6th, 2014
12:02 PM ET

Crime reporter and crack addict

Former Washington Post reporter Ruben Castaneda tells Brian Stelter how he reported on DC’s crack epidemic while hiding his own addiction to the drug. Castaneda is the author of the new book "S Street Rising."


Filed under: Reliable Sources • Washington Post
The business behind Ezra Klein's 'Project X'
January 27th, 2014
12:00 PM ET

The business behind Ezra Klein's 'Project X'

By Brian Stelter, CNN

Ezra Klein's announcement last week that he was leaving The Washington Post sparked a flurry of speculation about where he'd set up shop. On Sunday night he answered the question in a blog post: "Vox is our next."

The idea is a modern news site - heavy on context and explanation - and he's partnering with Vox Media, which runs a portfolio of digital publishers, including the Verge and SB Nation.

"Today, we are better than ever at telling people what's happening, but not nearly good enough at giving them the crucial contextual information necessary to understand what's happened," Klein wrote. "Our mission is to create a site that's as good at explaining the world as it is at reporting on it."

To better understand the game plan of the venture, codenamed "Project X," I reached out to Vox CEO Jim Bankoff.

Read more of Brian's article here.

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Filed under: Blog • Ezra Klein • Reliable Sources • Washington Post
December 29th, 2013
12:48 PM ET

Media year in review: Business

Rosie Gray, Christina Warren, Hunter Walker, David Folkenflik and Brian Stelter discuss the media business in 2013, including Jeff Bezos’s purchase of the Washington Post and the further decline of print media.

What we're reading this week...
November 15th, 2013
12:04 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Elizabeth Cherneff, CNN

We've got a busy show planned this Sunday when Frank Sesno, director of The George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs, joins us once again as our 'Reliable Sources' guest host. With the devastating Philippines typhoon aftermath, continued fallout after the 60 Minutes/Benghazi apology, plus Obamacare woes here at home, we'll take a look at how these stories (and more) have competed for media attention this week. In the meantime, here are some other items that caught our show team's eye- sign off in the comments and tell us what you're reading this week!

'Why South Korea's media are furious with Vladimir Putin'

Russian President Vladimir Putin is known for being unpredictable. And in a Washington Post piece this week, Max Fisher writes that South Korean journalists aren't too pleased amid his latest trip to the country. Referencing articles in several South Korean media outlets, he notes that Putin's tardiness to events & last-minute schedule changes have been carefully documented by some journalists, some even calling Putin's actions 'insulting.' Beyond this, Fisher posits that even these minor acts could have larger impacts on Russian, Mideast and Western foreign policy relations.

'What happens when the weather computer fails'

Justin Chambers, meteorologist for Colorado Springs Fox affiliate KXRM, knows what it's like to have his software crash at the last minute. So on Wednesday morning, after he tweeted a photo of his blank/non-functional weather monitor, he put his improvisational skills to use once again. Using everything from dancing and iPads to pantomiming weather patterns, Chambers proved once again that when it comes to the weather, no technical glitch can prevent him from bringing viewers the forecast.

'Jana Winter's case, and what it means for journalists'

Fox News reporter Jana Winter is the latest journalist facing legal repercussions for refusing to identify her sources on a story she wrote about Aurora, CO movie theater shooting suspect James Holmes in 2012.  The upcoming New York Court of Appeals decision on whether Winter will be forced to testify & identify her sources on that story (or face jail) could have far-reaching consequences for journalists nationwide. This week's Business Insider piece highlights differences in New York/Colorado's shield laws (meant to protect journalists from being compelled to testify), but notes that with laws differing by state, Winter's case could set important precedent for other reporters & their confidential sources.

For more media news, tune in Sunday at 11am ET.

September 15th, 2013
01:22 PM ET

Explaining Syria

Washington Post reporter Max Fisher joins guest host Patrick Gavin to break down Fisher's piece, ‘9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask.’ Then, Andrea Seabrook of Decode DC and  Emily Cadei of CQ Roll Call speak with Gavin about how a news consumer processes the volume of information on Syria.


Filed under: Syria • Washington Post
September 8th, 2013
01:11 PM ET

A new era at The Washington Post

When Jeff Bezos bought the legendary Washington-based newspaper, many questioned how involved the Amazon tycoon would be in the paper’s daily dealings. Vice President-at-large Len Downie, who worked at the paper for 44 years, joins Sesno to give his two cents on the Post’s future.


Filed under: Amazon • Jeff Bezos • Media • Washington Post
September 8th, 2013
01:10 PM ET

(Un)reliable Sources

Guest host Frank Sesno remarks on what makes a reliable source… and what doesn’t. (Teaser: Who knew a sex tape could teach you something outside the realm of sex?)


Filed under: Al Jazeera • Alyssa Milano • Edward Snowden • Egypt • New York Times • NSA • Sex Tape • Washington Post
September 6th, 2013
04:36 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Sara Fischer, CNN

We've got a packed show this week on Reliable Sources with guest host Frank Sesno, Director of The George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs. As a former CNN Washington bureau chief, Sesno will bring a unique perspective to this week’s media headlines.

We’ll kick off the show with CNN's Senior International Correspondent Arwa Damon, who will provide an update on the crisis in Syria, reporting live from Beirut. Conversation about the conflict will then continue with Tara Sonenshine, former Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs and Shibley Telhami, Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland, College Park.

CNN’s own digital political reporter, Peter Hamby, released a case study describing Twitter’s impact on the coverage of the 2012 presidential campaign. Hamby will speak with us live to discuss his research and experience and will be joined on a panel by Christina Bellantoni, politics editor for The PBS NewsHour and former senior Romney campaign advisor and CNN political commentator Kevin Madden

Then, we’ll sit down with former executive editor of The Washington Post, Len Downie, to get his take on Jeffrey Bezos’ purchase of Washington Post, a new study with the Committee to Protect Journalists on leaks from the Obama administration and stories this week about Edward Snowden

Finally, we’ll hear from POLITICO’s Susan Glasser about the impact and survival of long-form journalism.

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.

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Filed under: Blog • Politics • Reliable Sources • Sneak Peek • Syria • Twitter • Washington Post
August 25th, 2013
01:55 PM ET

The reporter who found “The Butler”

Washington Post reporter Wil Haygood sits down with guest host Eric Deggans to talk about his journey to find “The Butler" and how his article inspired the new hit movie.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • Lee Daniels • The Butler • Washington Post
August 23rd, 2013
05:14 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Sara Fischer, CNN

There’s a lot to discuss on ‘Reliable Sources’ this Sunday with our guest host, Eric Deggans, TV and media critic for the Tampa Bay Times and future TV critic for NPR.

We’ll start by taking a look at the coverage of the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. Additionally, we will discuss the media coverage of American civil rights with longtime CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather, along with Senior External Affairs Director of Free Press, Joseph Torres and Founding Member of the National Association of Black Journalists, Paul Delaney.

Also on the show, we’ll speak with a Brian Beutler, political writer for Salon and New York Times Columnist Charles Blow about whether the media has been hyping the national race discussion and the fairness of its’ coverage.

We’ll also invite panelists David Zurawik, television and media critic for The Baltimore Sun and Mohammed el Nawawy, author and professor at Queens University of Charlotte to give their take on the launch of Al Jazeera America this week.

Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute will also join us to discuss ESPN’s decision to pull its logo and credit from "Frontline's" upcoming documentary about the controversial subject of sports and brain injury.

Lastly, we will chat with Wil Haygood, columnist for The Washington Post, who first reported on veteran White House butler Eugene Allen, the man who served as the inspiration for Lee Daniel's new film, "The Butler."

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.


Filed under: Al Jazeera • Al Jazeera America • Civil Rights • ESPN • March on Washington • NFL • Race • Sneak Peek • The Butler • Washington Post
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