Sunday, September 28

The role of journalist during wartime; Did NFL ties lead ESPN to suspend analyst? Jorge Ramos' opinion on immigration in the media; ABC's handling of Miss America controversy.

The role of journalist during wartime; Did NFL ties lead ESPN to suspend analyst? Jorge Ramos' opinion on immigration in the media; ABC's handling of Miss America controversy.

What we're reading this week...
January 10th, 2014
02:24 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

It's been a great week for media news, so Brian Stelter and the Reliable team are busy gathering all the stories for our Sunday show. Look for a few segments on the release of a new book that blasts Roger Ailes, as well as an interview with an AP photographer who reunited a young, homeless man with his family simply taking a picture. Unfortunately, we can't fit everything into our one-hour show, so we decided to share a few other stories  that didn't make the cut this week:

'Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet'

Amanda Hess writes in the Pacific Standard that female journalists (and women in general) are falling victim to violent cyber attacks. In the article, Hess shares her own experiences of violent, sexual tweets and comments that have been directed at her from people who were angered by her articles. In one of the tweets, the writer tells her, "Happy to say we live in the same state. Im looking you up, and when I find you, im going to rape you and remove your head." Hess adds that despite reaching out to local and federal authorities, she is told to either quit Twitter or given the run-around by the police. Hess hopes that her article will bring light to an issue that is too often not taken seriously.

'Navy mistakenly sends FOIA plans to reporter'

Scott MacFarlane, a reporter for NBC 4 in Washington, D.C, reportedly filed several requests under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), but got more than he bargained for when the Navy accidentally sent him an internal memo about MacFarlane's requests. The Navy's official Twitter account has released an apology for the mistake.

"60 Minutes' Clean Tech Segment Disputed By Former Energy Department Loan Boss'

As if CBS '60 Minutes' didn't have enough public relations nightmares to deal with, another segment by the legendary newscast has recently come under fire. According to The Huffington Post, the segment "detail[ed] perceived failures in government support for the development of clean energy and other advanced technology," but was later "criticized for leaving out crucial information about the state of the clean tech sector and over-emphasizing governmental failures."

'TV news executive producer saves family from fire'

As journalists, we're always on the lookout for good stories, but one news producer went over and beyond the call of duty earlier this week in Dacula, Ga. On her way to work, she noticed a house on fire and immediately called 911, before running toward the house and "banging on the doors and windows" to get the people out to safety. Now that's a good producer.

For more media news, tune in Sunday at 11am ET.

What we're reading this week...
December 6th, 2013
12:54 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

'This woman took a selfie in front of a man attempting suicide'

From TMI mirror selfies to basically any Kim Kardashian selfie, cell phone cameras and social media have officially blurred the rules of what's appropriate to share... and what's not. But for one woman in New York, it might have been a case of simply taking a selfie at the wrong time. The New York Post published a picture of the young, blonde woman on the cover of its Monday edition, taking a selfie with a man attempting to commit suicide in the background. Perhaps, however, she didn't notice the suicidal man and was only taking a picture of the Brooklyn Bridge in the background. What do you think?

'The trouble at Bloomberg'

Bloomberg LP, known for its business-savvy reporting, has tripled its revenues in the 12 years since Michael Bloomberg traded his plushy corporate corner office for the city of New York's mayoral podium, according to Fortune. But while "Bloomberg is on track for record revenues of $8.3 billion in 2013 and profits of about $2.7 billion," the company is battling PR nightmares, including its most recent scandal of censoring its own journalists in China. Check out CNN Money's preview of the story after the jump.

'Can Politico take Manhattan?'

The publication known for inside-the-beltway news is breaking ground in a new city outside of the nation's capital. Politico's parent company recently purchased Capital New York, a small New York-based website, and Politico founder and CEO Jim VandeHei is gearing up for the company's expansion. "When you look at City Hall, when you look at Albany, when you look at media, even when you look at finance, I think there are huge pockets of this city that are under-covered or that could be covered exponentially better," VandeHei told Bloomberg News.

For more on Politico's new venture, tune in later this month for Brian Stelter's interview with VandeHei, and watch for Stelter's debut show this Sunday at 11am ET.

What we're reading this week...
November 22nd, 2013
11:21 AM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

Welcoming back Eric Deggans to the guest host chair, the Reliable Sources team has a great show planned for you this week. We'll be discussing the PR nightmare that MSNBC is battling with Martin Bashir and Alec Baldwin, BuzzFeed's recent hire of an international women's rights reporter, and race-themed films, to name a few. In the meantime, here are some other stories that caught our attention this week... what caught yours?

'Rob Burgundy sings for his 'dear friend" Toronto Mayor Rob Ford'

Here on 'Reliable Sources,' we're big fans of the Channel 4 News Teams, so when we heard that the original Anchorman was swinging by the 'Conan' set, we had to tune in. But to our surprise, he didn't spout sexist comments or whip out his jazz flute to serenade the audience. Instead, he broadcast his support for his "dear, dear, dear friend, Mayor Rob Ford of Toronto."  Spoiler Alert: Burgundy has a sexy voice, so prepare yourself.

'Politico's Mike Allen, native advertising pioneer'

Native advertising, a system where an advertisement is seen within the context of a story, works out well for the company paying for the prime placement. Unfortunately for the news organization, trading page space for payment has become a somewhat controversial topic in the journalism industry, generating a discussion about the ethics involved. BuzzFeed and The Atlantic have recently come under fire for their uses of native advertising, and Politico's Mike Allen is the latest to receive criticism for the questionable use of the marketing scheme. Some fans of Allen, however, applaud his ability to weave advertisements into the folds of his stories, to the point where the two are indistinguishable from one another.

'The incredible story of Marion Stokes'

In the social media generation, we can sometimes take for granted the fact that we live in the era of YouTube - the most it takes to call up a video of the Iranian hostage crisis or Hurricane Katrina is a few taps of the keyboard and the click of a mouse. For those of an older generation, though, there's something poetic about popping in a VHS tape to re-live moments of history. One Philadelphia woman took it to the extreme, taping 35 years of "network, local, and cable news, in her home, one tape at a time, recording every major (and trivial) news event until the day she died in 2012 at the age of 83 of lung disease." Can you guess how many tapes she collected over the years?

For more media news, tune in Sunday at 11am ET.

November 15th, 2013
04:04 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

George Washington University's Director of Media and Public Affairs Frank Sesno returns to guest host Reliable Sources this week with a full show planned for your viewing pleasure.

Up first, former CBS reporter Terence Smith, Politco's Dylan Byers, NY1's Errol Louis and the Chicago Sun Times' Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet join Sesno to discuss a smattering of media topics, including the '60 Minutes' apology for its erroneous report on Benghazi, a roundup of the reporting on Obamacare and the firestorm surrounding a Washington Post column that discussed New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's multiracial family.

Next, Sesno invites Philippe Cousteau, social entrepreneur and grandson of famed explorer Jacques Cousteau, and the New York Time's Andy Revkin to discuss the media's lack of coverage surrounding climate change. They'll debate ways media outlets could change their reporting and touch on the United Nations Climate Change Conference currently taking place in Warsaw, Poland.

Washington Post movie critic Ann Hornaday and Sesno then journey from the TV screen to the big screen to discuss a new study that looks at the rise in violence currently featured in PG-13 movies, as opposed to 30 years ago.

A week from today, America will mourn the loss of President John F. Kennedy, who was assassinated 50 years ago. We'll take a look at the media coverage from that time, as well as interview Esquire's Chris Jones, who wrote an amazing investigative article about the time spent aboard Air Force One on the trip from Dallas to Andrews Air Force Base.

Wrapping up the show, we visit The Newseum's newest exhibit, "Anchorman," which debuted yesterday to the public. The display ties into the release of next month's "Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues," a sequel 10 years in the making.

Only a few more days until Sunday's show.

Until then, you stay classy, viewers.

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Filed under: Reliable Sources • Sneak Peek
What we're reading this week...
October 31st, 2013
04:54 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

NPR's David Folkenflik returns to Reliable Sources this week as our guest host. Folkenflik and Team Reliable have some great topics planned for the show, but in the meantime here are some other stories that caught our eye this week:

'San Francisco Chronicle Bans "Redskins" From Print'

Jumping on the bandwagon with Slate and the Kansas City Star, the Bay Area newspaper has decided to strike the term "Redskins" from its vocabulary. According to a statement by Managing Editor Audrey Cooper, "Not everyone has to be personally offended by a word to make it a slur." Even President Obama has weighed in on the debate, saying "I don’t know whether our attachment to a particular name should override the real legitimate concerns that people have about these things."

'White House Photographer in Front Row at World Series'

Pete Souza literally has a front row seat to history - as the Chief Official White House photographer for Barack Obama, he's witnessed the President rise from United States Senator to Democratic Nominee and ultimately to the President of the United States. On Wednesday, though, he had a different kind of first row seat: watching the Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Cardinals in game six of the World Series.

'35 New Uses for Old Newspapers and Magazines'

Critics have long since promised the death of print journalism, and while we pray that isn't true, at least Buzzfeed found a creative way to soften the blow. With the aid of a glue gun and some scissors, you can now use your old newspapers and magazines to make dresses, wedding bouquets and even hair bows. Who knew?

'A Real Time Map of Births and Deaths'

Worried about missing your mother's birthday or that morning meeting with your boss? This map might just put things in perspective for you. Created by Brad Lyon (who holds a doctoral degree in mathematics), the interactive map shows the viewer births and deaths around the world in actual time. Creepy as it sounds, the map actually has some uses - namely, to understand how the world's population is growing toward nine million by 2042.

September 20th, 2013
06:34 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

NPR's David Folkenflik returns to Reliable Sources this week as our guest host, and with breaking news stories dominating the airwaves, we've got a great show prepared for you! But with Sunday still a couple of days away, here's a taste of what you can look forward to on Sunday:

Following the breaking news of a mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, news organizations rushed to report who the shooter was, what kind of gun he used and how many victims were hurt. Mistakes were made along the way, though, that ultimately framed the coverage of the story. Emily Miller, senior editor of opinion at The Washington Times, and Andrew Lih, a professor of journalism at American University, join Folkenflik to discuss. They'll also take a look at how the Wikipedia page devoted to the Navy Yard shootings evolved as the news itself changed.

When mass shootings take place, there’s often a debate over the level of “gun literacy” possessed by reporters.  Washington Post investigative reporter David Fallis, who has reported extensively on guns and has worked to promote greater gun literacy among reporters - will swing by the studio to explain.

After Julie Chen came forward to share her experience with plastic surgery - based on advice from former superiors who suggested she would need it to succeed in the industry - a chorus of support and criticism has caused the Asian-American talk-show host to prove eye surgery is the only surgery she's ever undergone. Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute joins Folkenflik to discuss Chen's decision to undergo the knife, as well as a broader debate on (un)realistic expectations for female journalists in the media industry.

Next up, The Guadian's Alan Rusbridger visits our show to discuss the partnership between the British newspaper and the state-side New York Times, as well as the issue of prior restraint or "pre-publication censorship" by the UK government.

Rounding out the show, we take a behind-the-scenes look at ESPN's "Pardon the Interruption" with co-host Tony Kornheiser, who discusses the system in place to fact check the numerous errors and omissions his show has made in its 12-year history.

Tune in Sunday at 11am ET.

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Filed under: ESPN • Female Journalists • Guns • Navy Yard Shooting • NSA • Racism • Sexism • The Guardian • The New York Times
August 30th, 2013
03:46 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

New York Times' media reporter Brian Stelter returns to host our show this week and he's brought with him a slew of great media topics to discuss. Since Sunday's still a few days away, though, here's a sneak peek to whet your appetite.

CNN's Frederik Pleitgen will be kicking off our show in Beirut with an update on the situation in Syria. Jumping back across the ocean to Washington D.C., our show will turn to the media's coverage of the Syrian civil war. The Huffington Post's Michael Calderone, The Daily Caller's Matt Lewis and Al Monitor's Foreign Policy Reporter Laura Rozen join Stelter in the studio to discuss how the media's coverage of the Iraq War might be shaping the coverage of the Syrian war, and ultimately, America's opinion of the war-ravaged region.

Then, The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald joins the show for an update on the NSA leak story and why it has become the story of the summer.

Keith Olbermann, formely of ESPN, MSNBC and Current TV, returned to ESPN this week with a new show. Deadspin's Tim Burke will weigh in on the anchor's 16-year hiatus from his first debut on the sports network, how Olbermann has changed and what he has planned for his new late-night show.

Finally, BuzzFeed's Whitney Jefferson swings by to assess the media circus surrounding Miley Cyrus' recent VMA performance.

Tune in Sunday morning at 11am ET.

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Filed under: Civil War • ESPN • Glenn Greenwald • Keith Olbermann • Miley Cyrus • NSA • Sneak Peek • Syria • Twerking
What we're reading this week...
August 23rd, 2013
10:49 AM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Becky Perlow, CNN

August may be a slow month for news, but Reliable's got a jam-packed show for you on Sunday with guest host Eric Deggans of The Tampa Bay Times. We'll be looking at the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the media's coverage of race-related issues and the launch of Qatar-based Al Jazeera America. Until then, check out what the Reliable staff is reading now.

Call me Chelsea: Three years have passed since Bradley Manning released hundreds of thousands of military papers. Still to be determined? How Manning's actions will affect the safety of Americans or the secrecy of the government. Manning was sentenced last week, convicted of 20 of 22 counts and sentences to 35 years in prison. In a recent twist, however, Manning released a statement on Thursday requesting news outlets refer to him/her as Chelsea Manning going forward. "I am a female. Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible," Manning said in a statement read on the Today show. So what should news organizations do?

Netflix can read your mind: With the aid of algorithms that could rival online dating websites, Netflix is now combing its users' video queue with its famous "Based on your viewing history" suggestion service. Users will now see suggestions based on what they've watched in the past, in addition to the star rating system associated with each movie. "The idea is to show users 'titles you’re most likely to want to watch right up front,' Netflix product executive Michael Spiegelman said, in a blog post introducing the change," explained the AllThingsD article. So be careful what you pick, because it just might appear on your Netflix homepage now - and it might be something you're embarrassed to be seen watching.

He said, she said: Mother Jones reportedly published a headline quoting Aaron Sorkin blasting The Huffington Post, which read  "Aaron Sorkin in Washington, DC: The Huffington Post Sucks.' Sorkin has come forward and claims he was not only not misquoted, but the quote was entirely fabricated. The author of the article has since responded to the Politico article about the alleged misquote, saying "he wrote the original headline and that Sorkin was definitely expressing his dislike of the Huffington Post."

July 26th, 2013
02:16 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

Frank Sesno, director of George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs, joins Reliable Sources this week as our guest host. As a former CNN Washington bureau chief, he's got an exciting show planned for Sunday - including Al Jazeera landing in America and the media's focus on Anthony Weiner.

When Anthony Weiner left Congress in disgrace following a sexting scandal in 2011, most critics believed his political career was effectively finished. Little did we know that Weiner would return to the political limelight in the form of a New York City mayoral race. Politico's Lois Romano and NY1's Errol Louis join Sesno to discuss what role Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin, plays in the coverage and whether the media are making too big a deal about the new, never-before-seen sexting pictures that were released earlier this week by TheDirty.com.

Next, ITV News Royal Correspondent Tim Ewart, Mediaite's Joe Concha and Time magazine's Europe Editor Catherine Mayer stop by the studio to share their insight into the British royal baby media debacle - was the wall-to-wall coverage justified? And does American really care about a new born baby across the pond?

Al Jazeera America is set to launch next month, and with it comes questions yet unanswered by the Qatar-based media network, including who will drive the editorial content and whether it will truly be an independent news organization? Former Al Jazeera English anchor David Marash joins Sesno to share his thoughts on their expansion into the States.

It's time to end the White House press briefings - at least that's what former White House Assistant Press Secretary Reid Cherlin wants you to believe. In a New Republic article, Cherlin argues that "The daily briefing has become a worthless chore for reporters, an embarrassing nuisance to administration staff, and a source of added friction between the two camps." Cherlin joins Sesno to discuss his recent article in the magazine.

Finally, Netflix stock may have dipped but its subscriber base is larger than ever. While some question its ability to produce truly originally programming, 14 Emmy nominations certainly seems to cinch their spot in TV programming history. Wired magazine's Peter Rubin and HLN Digital Lifestyle Expert Mario Armstrong will discuss the Emmy nominations, why Netflix is so popular and where they see the video streaming site's business model moving in the future.

Tune in this Sunday at 11am ET.

July 12th, 2013
07:18 PM ET

Sneak peek at this Sunday's show

By Becky Perlow, CNN

After more than a year of non-stop media coverage, protests and court hearings, the George Zimmerman trial is set to wrap up in the next few days. All three 24-hour news networks have spent the past few weeks producing wall-to-wall coverage of the murder trial - but how fair has the coverage been to the prosecution and to the defendant? Callie Crossley, host of WGBH's  "Boston Public Radio" will join our guest host, NPR's David Folkenflik, to discuss.

Next, The Guardian's Ana Marie Cox, The Washington Post's Carlos Lozada and The Atlantic's Molly Ball  swing by the studio to weigh in on Mark Leibovich's new book, "This Town," which focuses on inside-the-beltway relationships between politicos, the press and the parties they attend together. Luckily for us, Lozada says there are 10 rules for succeeding in "This Town" (aka Washington D.C.). Can you guess what they are?

Jumping a topic train from DC politics to New York election races, our group adds former New York Post reporter Leela de Kretzer to  discuss tabloid coverage of Eliot Spitzer's and Anthony Weiner's upcoming bids for NYC comptroller and mayor, respectively. But as Ball wrote earlier this week in the Atlantic, "If Spitzer and Weiner manage to join Sanford in getting elected post-sex scandal, they won't be signaling a bold new trend. They'll be doing what politicians have always done: getting in trouble and then getting elected anyway."

Rupert Murdoch has agreed to testify before the British Parliament following the leak of a secretly taped recording where he has an ethically questionable conversation with News Corp journalists. Former Member of Parliament Louise Mensch, who questioned Murdoch during his original testimony to Parliament, joins Folkenflik to share her insight into the secret tape and what it's like to now work for one of Murdoch's newspapers, The Sun.

Next, former Al Jazeera English anchor David Marash and NPR's Cairo bureau chief Leila Fadel weigh in on Al Jazeera's struggle with editorial independence and coping with the Egyptian military following recent Egyptian protests in Cairo.

Rounding out the show, president and general manager of WDRB Louisville Bill Lamb tells Folkenflik why his station is moving away from the "breaking news" hype.

Tune in Sunday at 11am ET.

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