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December 8th, 2013
12:37 PM ET

Mandela and the media

Bill Keller of the New York Times sits down with Brian Stelter to reflect on his experience covering the life of Nelson Mandela.


Filed under: Media • Media Criticism • Nelson Mandela • New York Times • South Africa
November 3rd, 2013
12:58 PM ET

Keller vs. Greenwald: Bill's take

New York Times opinion columnist Bill Keller talks with guest host David Folenflik about his exchange with Glenn Greenwald and his belief that journalists should keep their opinions out of their reporting.

September 8th, 2013
01:10 PM ET

(Un)reliable Sources

Guest host Frank Sesno remarks on what makes a reliable source… and what doesn’t. (Teaser: Who knew a sex tape could teach you something outside the realm of sex?)


Filed under: Al Jazeera • Alyssa Milano • Edward Snowden • Egypt • New York Times • NSA • Sex Tape • Washington Post
August 25th, 2013
01:55 PM ET

ESPN pulls out of PBS partnership

Former ESPN ombudsman Kelly McBride and guest host Eric Deggans on the NFL’s alleged pressure on ESPN to pull out of a documentary partnership with PBS that focused on NFL head injuries.


Filed under: Eric Deggans • ESPN • Football Head Injuries • Frontline • New York Times • NFL • PBS
August 18th, 2013
02:21 PM ET

NY Times’ internal watchdog

Joanne Lipman sits down with New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan to discuss her important role.


Filed under: Blog • New York Times • Reliable Sources
August 15th, 2013
06:24 PM ET

What we're reading this week...

By Sara Fischer, CNN

We’ve got a busy show planned for Sunday with our ‘Reliable Sources’ guest host, author and editor Joanne Lipman. Lipman is a former editor at the Wall Street Journal and Conde Nast and is co-editor of the forthcoming, “Strings Attached.” We’ll discuss the dangers of reporting on the recent outbreaks of violence in Egypt, the coverage of President’s vacation in Martha’s Vineyard, and the new trend of crowdsourcing social media online, but until then; here are some other stories that caught our eye this week.

Facebook use 'makes people feel worse about themselves'

BBC News cites a study by the University of Michigan which concludes that checking Facebook makes people feel worse about their sense of well-being and satisfaction with life. The study examines the causal relationship between Facebook usage and loneliness, concluding that the more participants used Facebook, the less satisfied they were with their lives. This condition, referred to as fear of missing out, or FOMO, occurs when Facebook users look at pictures of friends having a good time at events in which they are not included or present.

New York Times Website Back Online After ‘Internal Issue’

New York Times readers were in for a surprise when they learned that the newspaper’s website and email went down late Wednesday morning into late Thursday morning. Visitors were greeted by an error message upon visiting the site during the crash. The New York Times issued an apology message upon the restoration saying, “To our customers: As you know, our web site was unavailable for a period of time earlier today. The outage occurred within seconds of a scheduled maintenance update, which we believe was the cause. We are working on fully restoring service and apologize for any inconvenience.”

Limbaugh, Hannity, Levin eyed as 2016 GOP debate moderators

The Washington Examiner’s “Washington Secrets” blog reports that GOP insiders are considering a panel of conservative radio hosts, including Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh and Mark Levin, as debate moderators in 2016. The GOP sources tell the Examiner that pressure from viewers combined with the potential for increased viewership are two factors in the consideration of the conservative personalities as moderators. The announcement comes a week after Reince Priebus, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, dismissed Mika Brzezinski of NBC’s Morning Joe as a potential Republican debate moderator due to her affiliation with NBC, whose entertainment sector plans to produce a miniseries on Hillary Clinton.


Filed under: Blog • CNN • Facebook • New York Times • Reliable Sources • Rush Limbaugh • Washington Post • What we're reading
July 28th, 2013
01:40 PM ET

Anthony Weiner media circus

Errol Louis and Lois Romano speak with guest host Frank Sesno on the week's coverage of Anthony Weiner's latest sex scandal.

What we're reading this week
July 25th, 2013
05:41 PM ET

What we're reading this week

By Sara Fischer, CNN

The New York Times debuts its first “Times Documentary”

In April 2012, the New York Times published a five-part series of articles written by New York Times published reporter John Branch, illustrating the reality of the cultural pressures surrounding a girls' basketball team, Carroll Academy, a juvenile court-run school in Huntingdon, Tennessee. The sports editor of the New York Times received an overwhelming amount of public support for them team following the series being published. In response to the reaction, Branch revisited the team, the “Lady Jaguars,” to write two more articles, highlighting the community struggling with “high unemployment, teen pregnancy and rampant methamphetamine and prescription drug abuse.” The New York Times decided to turn Branch’s stories into a 17-minute documentary, the first “Times documentary”-branded video that the traditionally print-based publication has ever produced. The Huffington Post discusses the role of documentaries in telling a traditional print-story and how it changes the consumption of the story for its’ viewers.

Buzzfeed discovers the "Smartest Ever Ad Campaign to use National Flags"

Grande Reportagem, a Portuguese news magazine, hired a Lisbon-based ad agency called DraftFCB to create a simple yet effective print ad campaign that is geared to represent humanitarian struggles worldwide through the imagery of various country’s flags. For example, an image of the United States represents American’s knowledge (or lack there of) of the Iraq War. The blue space represents the number of Americans who do not know what the Iraq War is, in comparison the red space which represents those in favor of the War, and the white space, those opposed. While the statistical representations are not completely accurate, due to the rough-to-scale proportions of the flags images, they do a great job of informing the viewer of the general disparities in human conditions worldwide.

New York officials are investigating Bloomberg reporters' access to to consumers information

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's office is investigating how much access Bloomberg LP news reporters may have had to the company’s customers. “The probe follows inquiries made in May by the U.S. Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury into Bloomberg customer data access,” The Wall Street Journal reports. The article also discusses the issue of reporters' knowledge about client activities in a wider context describing how the issue first came about in 2012 when “officials complained to Bloomberg about reporters' access to bankers and traders' whereabouts and log in data, which the firm felt was a violation of its employees' privacy."

What we’re reading this week
April 18th, 2013
06:27 PM ET

What we’re reading this week

By Laura Koran, CNN

On this week’s show, we will be taking a look at the media’s hits and misses covering the attack on the Boston Marathon. Tune in for that on Sunday, and see what other stories caught our attention this week right here.

The wisdom of Mr. Rogers: In the aftermath of terrible tragedies, such as the Boston Marathon bombings, people tend to seek out examples of human kindness to dispel the notion that the world is a dark and hateful place. It is not surprising then, that a meme featuring the beloved children’s show host Mr. Rogers has gone viral since Monday’s terrorist attack. The image, circulating on social media sites, displays one of Mr. Rogers’ classic, heartfelt musings: “When I was a boy and I would see scary things on the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’” As Reverend J.C. Austin points out, these simple words hold a deeper truth, and serve as a powerful reminder that the “helpers” are more powerful than the “haters.”

Is brevity the soul of good reporting? A chart recently released by Dean Starkman of Columbia Journalism Review shows that the number of long-form stories (in this case, stories with more than 2,500 words) published by The Wall Street Journal has declined significantly over the past decade. The paper responded to the chart saying in part, “The number of words in an article has never been the barometer by which the quality of a publication or its value to readers should be measured.” But many, including Alexis C. Madrigal of The Atlantic, are left wondering whether this new preference for shorter news stories can be attributed to the robust paywall on the paper’s website.

A fly on the wall: New York Times reporter Brian Stelter caught a truly lucky break when he was tipped off about a lunch between “Today” host Matt Lauer, and his former co-host Meredith Viera. That lunchtime chat, which Stelter surreptitiously eavesdropped on from the bar at New York restaurant Park Avenue Spring, provided the closing anecdote for Stelter’s new book, “Top of the Morning: Inside the Cutthroat World of Morning TV,” which releases next week. Stelter recounts how Viera reassured Lauer that the slew of negative media coverage of his involvement in Ann Curry’s removal from the show would soon pass, telling him, “It’ll be O.K.”

Learning from history: A new documentary short premiering at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival takes a look at The New York Times’ dismal coverage of the Holocaust during World War II. The film, “Reporting on the Times,” is the work of 22-year old filmmaker Emily Harrold, who hopes her movie can serve as a warning to news organizations covering (or not covering) human rights crises today. The Times has long been criticized for under-reporting on the Holocaust; criticism that the paper itself has called, “valid.”

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Filed under: Matt Lauer • Media • Media Criticism • Mr. Rogers • NBC • New York Times • Today • Wall Street Journal • What we're reading
April 14th, 2013
01:12 PM ET

Weiner’s Confessional Interview

Paul Begala and Howard Kurtz assess how the New York Times Magazine handled its revealing interview with former congressman Anthony Weiner.


Filed under: Anthony Weiner • Blog • New York Times • Reliable Sources
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